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Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

The T1D news show you've been waiting for! Long-time broadcaster, blogger and diabetes mom Stacey Simms interviews prominent advocates, authors and speakers. Stacey asks hard questions of healthcare companies and tech developers and brings on "everyday' people living with type 1. Great for parents of T1D kids, adults with type 1 and anyone who loves a person with diabetes.
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Now displaying: 2022
Oct 14, 2022

It's It’s “In the News…” a look at the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. This week: Provention Bio hopes to get FDA approval of Teplizumab next month and partners with Sanofi on this T1D prevention drug, new type 2 studies show that younger people who develop it generally have worse health outcomes, Medicare considers expanded coverage of CGMs and more

Learn more about the T1D Exchange: www.T1Dexchange.org/Stacey 

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
XX
Provention Bio partners with Sanofi to help bring teplizumab to market. Teplizumab isn’t yet approved, the FDA is expected to give it the thumbs up later this year.. this is the drug shown to prevent type 1 diabetes for up to three years. Among other things, Sanofi will get exclusive global marketing rights for the drug. The FDA had asked for more information the last time teplizumab was up for approval.. the three month period for that closes in November.. and a ruling is expected then.
https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/proventions-regulatory-odyssey-diabetes-nears-its-end-company-taps-sanofi-marketing-assist
XX
New research has found that the age at which people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is associated with a higher risk of developing serious complications.
The study, which was published in JAMA Network Open, analyzed health data from more than 36,000 Americans aged 50 and above.
The researchers found that those who were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between the ages of 50 and 59 had “elevated risks” of heart disease, stroke, disability, cognitive impairment, and early death. But when people were diagnosed with diabetes later in life, the risks were reduced.1 No obvious reason for that.. but the researchers say it does point to the need for more screening and better prevention and treatment.
https://www.verywellhealth.com/type-2-diabetes-diagnosis-age-6747897
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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has proposed new draft coverage guidelines for continuous glucose monitors.
Under the proposal, the CMS would cover CGMs for diabetes patients who are treated with insulin or “have a history of problematic hypoglycemia,” as defined by the frequency or severity of low blood sugar events, seemingly regardless of whether they have Type 1 or 2 diabetes.
Analysts at J.P. Morgan said the proposal reads “very favorably” for Abbott and Dexcom, leading CGM manufacturers that are targeting the “massive and highly under-penetrated Type 2 market opportunity.”
https://www.medtechdive.com/news/dexcom-abbot-CGM-diabetes-coverage/633577/
XX
Mark cuban’s Cost Plus Drugs has joined with
@RocheDiabetesUS
to provide our patients with their line of Accu-ChekⓇ test strips, lancets, & meters!

This partnership will allow anyone to access what they need to check their blood sugar, at a low price.
XX
Researchers who study Type 2 diabetes have reached a stark conclusion: There is no device, no drug powerful enough to counter the effects of poverty, pollution, stress, a broken food system, cities that are hard to navigate on foot and inequitable access to health care, particularly in minority communities. This is a long and complicated article published in the New York Times.. I’ll link it up and I urge you to read it. I can’t really to it justice in a short excerpt here.
“Our entire society is perfectly designed to create Type 2 diabetes,” said Dr. Dean Schillinger, a professor of medicine at University of California, San Francisco. “We have to disrupt that.”
Dr. Schillinger and nearly two dozen other experts laid out a road-map for doing so earlier this year in a comprehensive national report to Congress on diabetes, the first of its kind since 1975.
It calls for reframing the epidemic as a social, economic and environmental problem, and offers a series of detailed fixes, ranging from improving access to healthy food and clean water to rethinking the designs of communities, housing and transportation networks.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/05/health/diabetes-prevention-diet.html
XX
Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
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The Diabetes Design initiative is looking for college age people with type 1 to help them design the ultimate alarm for an extreme low. I’ll put the contact info in the show notes, along with a link to the website. By the way, I had never heard of the Diabetes Design Initiative but boy do I know these names and you probably do too. Ben West, Dana Lewis and a few others from the history of we are not waiting
http://ddi.ucsd.edu/about.html
Grace Zheng gzheng@ucsd.edu
XX
On the podcast next week.. teens and type 1 – a deep dive into why teen retreats work from the people who organize a great one.. and how adults with type 1 still use the lessons they learned as teens.
This past episode is all about Dexcom design.
Listen wherever you get your podcasts
Hey for you parents, we’ve got a webinar on Halloween, link in the show notes and on my social media.
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Oct 11, 2022

We're taking a look at the design decisions that go into diabetes technology, specifically Dexcom’s G7. Beyond the accuracy and interoperability we all want, they also look at things like dexterity, feel and hand strength. Alex Diener is Dexcom’s Senior Director of Global Product Design. He lives with type 1 and he shared a lot of the behind the scenes thought process that’s gone into the design of the G7 sensor and transmitter and the apps that go along with it.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Halloween webinar for parents: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0Xaaj9hoR-u96Kxm-OjfSQ

Moms' Night Out event: https://diabetes-connections.com/diabetes-connections-presents-moms-night-out/

Check out Stacey's books and use promo code "Spooky" to save $3!

More about Dexcom:

Our interviews with CEO Kevin Sayer: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=sayer

Our interviews with COO Jake Leach: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=leach

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Oct 7, 2022

It’s “In the News…” a look at the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. This week: Michigan joins California in exploring producing and distributing insulin made in-state, new study looks at why girls have a harder time with T1D than boys, weekly basal insulin moves forward, Dexcom puts G7 in wider release (but not yet in the US) and more!

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
XX
Michigan following California when it comes to exploring making and distributing insulin. Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed an executive directive this week to establish a Michigan-based insulin manufacturing facility, and facilitate the development, in conjunction with a partner or partners, of a low-cost insulin product for distribution in Michigan. Whitmer already announced a plan to cap insulin costs in her State of the State address in January.
https://michiganadvance.com/blog/whitmer-signs-directive-seeking-to-lower-insulin-costs-wins-bipartisan-praise/
XX
Novo Nordisk plans to move forward with its once a week insulin icodec. Recent studies show it worked as well or better than daily basal insulin, reducing A1C after 52 weeks.

Novo Nordisk’s ONWARDS program for once-weekly insulin icodec comprises six phase 3a global clinical trials, including a trial with RWE involving more than 4,000 adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

It is expected that Novo Nordisk will file for regulatory approval of the once-weekly insulin icodec in the first half of 2023 in the US, the EU, and in China.
There is a separate and additional study for people with type 1 – looking at weekly insulin icodec wth mealtime insulin. That’s expected to conclude in about six months.
https://pharmaphorum.com/news/novo-nordisk-achieve-headline-results-with-icodec-insulin/
XX
Big new study shows that girls tend to have more serious issues with type 1 diabetes than boys. This is physical, quantifiable stuff, including higher blood sugar levels, weight issues, and higher cholesterol. This was a review of 90 previous studies at Amsterdam University Medical Centers. that women and girls have typically not received as much attention as study subjects as men. These researchers say more study is needed including finding ways to help doctors treat girls with type I diabetes differently than boys

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/why-type-1-diabetes-can-be-tougher-on-girls-than-boys
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Alarming new study says that cases of type 1 worldwide could double by 2040. Tracking has improved in recent years, but Type 1 diabetes is underrepresented. In addition, because many countries don’t collect Type 1 diabetes data, the numbers have historically skewed toward North America and Europe. About 175,000 people worldwide died because of Type 1 diabetes in 2021, they believe, and 63 to 70 percent of the deaths in those under age 25 occurred because the disease wasn’t diagnosed. This study is in the Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology
https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2022/10/03/diabetes-type-one-surge/
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Big new study looking at which drugs paired with Metformin work the best for type 2. The trial was conducted at 36 study centers nationwide with more than 5000 people. Three groups took metformin plus a medicine that increased insulin levels: sitagliptin or Januvia, liraglutide or Victoza, or glimepiride or Amaryl. The fourth group took metformin and a long acting insulin.
After about five years of follow-up, the researchers found that all four drugs improved blood glucose levels when added to metformin. But those taking metformin plus liraglutide or the long-acting insulin achieved and maintained their target blood levels for the longest time. The effects of treatment did not differ with age, sex, race, or ethnicity.
However, none of the combinations overwhelmingly outperformed the others.
https://www.nih.gov/news-events/nih-research-matters/popular-diabetes-drugs-compared-large-trial
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Dexcom’s G7 is getting a wider rollout: the United Kingdom, Ireland, Germany, Austria and Hong Kong, with launches in New Zealand and South Africa in the coming weeks. I’ll link up the promotional video.. no news yet from the US FDA on when the G7 will be approved in the US. I am talking to Dexcom’s Senior Director of Global Product Design for Tuesday’s podcast episode.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYqNUf0paAU
XX
Tandem’s t:connect mobile app is now compatible with the latest iOS operating system on version 2.3 of the t:connect mobile app. Until this update, you could lose the mobile bolus if you updated your phone. Tandem also added a new iPhone and nine new android devices to their compatibility list. We’ll link that up in the show notes.
: https://www.tandemdiabetes.com/.../device-compatibility

XX
Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
XX
The College Diabetes Network announces a name change – they’ll now be known as the Diabetes Link. The groups says this new name reflects a commitment to expand support to the larger young adult diabetes community, whatever the type of diabetes they live with and whether they’re in school or in the workforce. Currently, there are 3 million young adults (ages 17-30) living with diabetes in the U.S. and that number continues to increase every day. The Diabetes Link is the only national organization that focuses specifically on people in their teens and twenties, in recognition that this time of their lives is full of enough change and challenges without a chronic disease added to the mix.
XX
And finally, another zoo animal with a CGM. Tiana is a lemur in New Zeleand. The zoo’s education officer, has diabetes and recommended the Dexcom for the lemur. Interestingly, they aren’t using insulin here, but rather a hypoglycemia medication and are altering the lemur’s diet. Apparently lemurs are prone to something more like type 2 diabetes due to some iron issues or if they eat too much sugar, but Tiana’s case more resembles type 1.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/130016440/meet-tiana-the-diabetic-lemur-with-a-glucose-monitor-stuck-to-her-back#:~:text=Hamilton%20Zoo%20resident%20lemur%2C%20Tiana,with%20diabetes%20in%20the%20zoo.&text=Zoo%20vet%20Tori%20Turner%20says,Hamilton%20has%20joined%20the%20club.
XX
On the podcast next week.. Dexcom’s Senior Director of Global Product Design – Very We’ll talk about what goes into designing a comletley new product like the G7. He lives with type 1 himself.
This past episode is all about how diabetes communities around the world stayed connected during the early days of the pandemic,
Listen wherever you get your podcasts
Hey for you parents, we’ve got a webinar on Halloween, link in the show notes and on my social media.
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Oct 4, 2022

Many of you tuned in virtually to EASD or maybe you were lucky enough to travel there! There was one talk at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes that really got my attention: the #dedoc° symposia “What we wish you knew — and why” which featured advocates speaking on topics that are relevant to people living with diabetes. The topic for this one is: Novel forms of online peer support developed during COVID; how did communities around the world stay connected?

#dedoc° was founded in 2012 by Bastian Hauck, who created the Twitter hashtag #dedoc to host weekly TweetChats for the German chapter of the Diabetes Online Community. It acted as a catalyst to grow a small group of diabetes bloggers into one of Europe’s strongest patient advocacy and peer support communities.

This is an excerpt from the symposium – you can watch the entire thing including the Q&A at the end – at www.dedoc.org/symposium.

Speakers:

Renza Scibilia,  Diabetes Australia

Andrea Limbourg, France

Jeff Hitchcock, Children with Diabetes, USA

Salih Hendricks, South Africa

Tom Dean, UK, Twitter DiabetesChat

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Sep 30, 2022

It's "In the News..." a look at the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. This week: new information about COVID and type 1 in kids, a new way to look for diabetes before symptoms appear, Medtronic may be ready to ship their 7-day infusion set, approved more than a year ago, and more.

Thanks to our sponsor, T1D Exchange: www.t1dexchange.org/Stacey

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
XX
A pair of studies released within days of one another have produced conflicting reports related to the apparent increase in type 1 diabetes diagnoses following a COVID-19 infection in younger patients. one of the studies suggests a COVID-19 infection was associated with up to a 72% increase in new diagnoses of type 1 diabetes, the second, suggests while overall rates of diagnoses may be elevated, COVID-19 may not be the cause of increased prevalence.
The second group says we need to consider what has happened regarding the spread of viruses such as enteroviruses during the pandemic, and whether there are any other environmental factors, such as sunlight exposure and vitamin D levels, that might have altered during lockdown that might also be relevant.” The group whose findings suggest covid is the link are asking families with any family history of type 1 to watch for symptoms in the year following a child’s Covid diagnosis. Both groups are pushing for more study,

https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/studies-debate-link-between-covid-19-and-increased-type-1-diabetes-diagnoses
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Insulin pricing legislation might get another look this year.. Sens. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, are working to update a draft bill that would cap consumer copays for insulin in the commercial market and incentivize drugmakers to lower list prices. One of the bill’s provisions capping Medicare copays at $35 a month was enacted as part of the Democrats’ budget bill in August.
The bill would extend the $35 Medicare copay cap to the commercial market. It would also ban health plans from requiring doctors’ approval before prescribing a drug and prohibit manufacturer rebates when drugmakers freeze their list prices at 2021 Medicare net rates.
Senate Majority Leader Charles E. Schumer has repeatedly voiced plans to bring the bill to the floor but the timeline keeps slipping. It’s not expected this would make it in front of lawmakers again until after the midterms.
https://rollcall.com/2022/09/28/lawmakers-eye-lame-duck-for-unfinished-business-on-insulin/
XX
The Medtronic Extended infusion set (EIS) is the newest insulin pump infusion set from Medtronic and the first and only set that can be worn for twice the wear time!

With the Extended infusion set and reservoir, patients can keep the infusion sites they prefer working longer while also benefiting from the easy insertion process currently available with the MiniMedTM MioTM Advance infusion set (which also means training is a breeze).

The Medtronic Extended Insuion set worn on the arm.
Components of the Medtronic Extended infusion set
We know you're wondering how does this work? The EIS introduces innovative technology that allows for longer wear by mitigating the insulin degradation and preservative loss seen in 2–3-day infusion sets. Specifically, it is designed with tubing that features advanced materials to help reduce insulin preservative loss and maintain insulin flow and stability. It also has a new tubing connector that improves the physical and chemical stability of insulin by filtering out insulin fibrils. Fibrils are strands of destabilized insulin that clump together and can contribute to poor glycemia due to infusion set occlusion and immune response at the infusion site.1 Lastly, the EIS has an improved adhesive patch that extends wear-time and provides comfort, keeping the infusion set in place for up to 7 days. All these elements help to further reduce the burden on the patient.

What if a patient uses more than 300 units of U-100 insulin in a 7-day period? No problem. Patients with increased insulin needs will also be able to benefit from using the Extended infusion set by simply changing their reservoir mid-way through their use of the set. To support these patients, innovative and simple training resources will be made available.

Stay tuned for more details regarding the Medtronic Extended infusion set and reservoir product launch later this year! In the meantime, if you have any questions, please contact your local Medtronic Diabetes representative.
https://www.medtronic.com/us-en/healthcare-professionals/therapies-procedures/diabetes/education/diabetes-digest/extended-infusion-set-and-reservoir.html?fbclid=IwAR0HntZBo0NuYSH_hqPAVHQTJrvkZdXK3-pSooS5UOqPuK_S3-AM8cheYqk
XX
A possible new way to test for type 1 diabetes way before symptoms.. very early here but new research is trying to pinpoint the start of the auto-immune process. These researchers at Boston University say
"Previous studies have focused on the triggers, genes and proteins that differentiate individuals with T1D from those without diabetes with a focus on the b-cell (b-cells create antibodies) as a target of immune destruction and blood glucose as the main abnormality
Their focus is on metabolic communication as an early instigator with the b-cell as an active participant together with the immune cells," explains corresponding author Barbara Corkey, Ph.D., professor emeritus of medicine and biochemistry at BUSM.

According to Corkey, her research led her to generate the testable hypothesis that the induction of autoimmunity is a consequence of one or more major inflammatory events in susceptible individuals. It’s al ot more complicated than that.. I’ll ink up the research published in the journal Diabetes.
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-09-hypothesis-autoimmunity-patients-diabetes.html
XX
Hysterectomy is the second most common surgery for women in the United States. About 600,000 hysterectomies — the surgical removal of part or all of a woman’s uterusTrusted Source — are performed in the U.S. each year.

Previous research has linked hysterectomies to an increased risk of cardiovascular diseaseTrusted Source, incident hypertension, and thyroid cancer.

Now, researchers from CHU de Rennes in Renne, France, have discovered a correlation between hysterectomy and increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes, especially among women under 45 years of age.

The research, which has not yet been peer reviewed and published, was recently presented at the 2022 European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) Annual Meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/women-face-increased-risk-of-type-2-diabetes-following-hysterectomy
XX
Gotta love this creative and possibly very useful question: when bear hibernate, why don’t they get diabetes? They eat tens of thousands of calories a day, balloon in size, then barely move for months.
To answer that question, Washington state University researchers went to work.
To find out how, researchers drew blood serum from six captive grizzly bears—aged between five and 13 years—at the WSU Bear Center, a research facility in Pullman, Washington. They also collected bear fat tissue that they used to grow cell cultures in the lab.

This experiment helped the team narrow down the bears' secret to controlling their insulin: Eight key proteins that seem to have a unique role in bear biology, working either independently or together to regulate insulin during hibernation.

Because humans share most of our genes with bears, understanding the role of these eight proteins could teach scientists more about human insulin resistance, Perry says.
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/article/hibernating-bears-could-hold-a-clue-to-treating-diabetes
XX
Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
XX
Couple of events coming up next week:
Hope you are doing well! I’m reaching out about an upcoming virtual streaming event hosted by Dexcom on Tuesday, Oct. 4 that will feature an exciting OUS (outside the U.S.) announcement from Dexcom leadership and Dexcom Warriors around the globe.

The diabetes community will have access to the event beginning at 8 a.m. BT / 3 a.m. ET / midnight PT on Oct. 4 at DexcomEvent.com.
XX
Do you want to learn how to think differently about your life with type 1 diabetes?

Click this link to register now! ==> www.reimaginet1d.com

Join Dr. Mark Heyman for the 2nd Annual ReImagine T1D virtual workshop on October 6 from 7:30p - 9:30p Eastern!

ReImagine T1D will challenge you to reimagine what is possible in your life with T1D and give you a roadmap to help them get there. After attending this ReImagine T1D, you'll have practical tools and actionable strategies that will empower you to live a full, flexible life without letting the emotional burden of T1D hold you back.

If you cannot attend the event live a replay will be available, but you MUST register!

Click this link to register now! ==> www.reimaginet1d.com

XX
On the podcast next week.. I’ll have more about Dexcom’s announcement and you’ll hear about how diabetes communities around the world pivoted during covid to better reach their people. Very cool stories from a recent conference featuring diabetes online and offline communities.
This past episode is all about
Listen wherever you get your podcasts
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Sep 27, 2022

Dexcom's G7 is still not approved in the United States, but it's in limited release in Europe. This week, friend of the show Kamil Armacki, better known as Nerdabetic, interviews Dexcom's Chief Operating Officer, Jake Leach.

Find more about Kamil over at his amazing YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/c/nerdabetic

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Sep 23, 2022

It’s In the News! This week’s top diabetes headlines and stories include: cybersecurity risk cited for some Medtronic pumps, Omnipod 5 gets European approval, new data about the Freestyle Libre and avoiding hospitalizations, the new T1D Index and more!

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
XX
XX
potential cybersecurity risk for Medtronic MiniMed 600 Series Insulin Pump Systems. The FDA sent out an alert for multiple systems including the MiniMed 630 G and MiniMed 670G. They say this is a potential issue and that there have NOT been any reports of actually unauthorized access. Medtronic has issued an Urgent Medical Device Correction on their own website notifying users as well as providing recommended actions.
If unauthorized access occurs, the pump’s communication protocol could be compromised, which may cause the pump to deliver too much or too little insulin,” noted the FDA’s September 20 Cybersecurity alert.

On their website, Medtronic provides the Urgent Medical Device Correction, a list of model numbers impacted by the issue, and a multitude of frequently asked questions for device users. Within these resources, Medtronic notes the issue was identified through an internal review and, while the event meets the definition of a recall, users are not required to return their devices.

In a letter to users, which was signed by Chirag Tilara, vice president of Quality at Medtronic Diabetes, and Robert Vigersky, MD, chief medical officer at Medtronic Diabetes, the pair recommended all patients turn off the “Remote Bolus” feature on their pump if it is turned on, which is on by default. The letter also urged users to conduct any connection linking of devices in a nonpublic setting. Additional recommended precautions from Medtronic included keeping pump and connected system components within user control at all times, be attentive to pump notifications, alarms, and alerts, and immediately cancel any boluses you or your care partner did not initiate.

The FDA urged those with questions to reach out to Medtronic at 1-800-646-4633, option 1.
https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/cybersecurity-risk-minimed-600-systems-alert-from-fda-medtronic
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Omnipod 5 gets the CE Mark, that’s European approval for individuals aged two years and older with type 1 diabetes. This comes as Insulet presents new studies at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220920005138/en/Insulet-Announces-CE-Mark-Approval-for-Omnipod%C2%AE-5-Automated-Insulin-Delivery-System

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Abbott says the Freestyle Libre system can help reduce diabetes-related hospitalizations. Data from the Real-World Evidence of Freestyle Libre (RELIEF) were presented this week. The retrospective study of the French national health claims database shows that the 5,933 people with Type 2 diabetes who were following a basal-only regimen and using the FreeStyle Libre system had 67% fewer ADE-related hospitalizations one year after initiating the FreeStyle Libre treatment.
The data also show a 75% reduction in hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a potentially life-threatening condition when glucose levels are too high for too long and ketone levels rise to dangerous levels in the blood, and a 44% reduction in admissions for severe hypoglycemia (low glucose levels).

Further, the study showed sustained reductions in hospitalizations over a two-year period of FreeStyle Libre system use, regardless of whether the patients were under the care of a diabetes specialist or a general healthcare practitioner.
https://www.mddionline.com/diabetes/can-abbotts-freestyle-libre-help-reduce-diabetes-related-hospitalizations
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A look at bone health and type 1 diabetes in teen girls. Small study herewith girls age 10-16.. found that the more sedentary had worse markers of bone health in imaging tests than girls without diabetes. When the groups had the same physical activity, no difference was seen regardless of diabetes. However, this is early research and further study is needed, the group cautions.

However, if further, rigorous studies confirm these findings, "physical activity is potentially a really effective means of improving bone quality in kids with type 1 diabetes."
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981092
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Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
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DRF, a global type 1 diabetes (T1D) research and advocacy organization, announces the launch of the Type 1 Diabetes Index (T1D Index). The T1D Index is a first-of-its-kind data simulation tool that measures the human and public health impact of the T1D crisis in every country across the globe. Until now, there have been wide gaps in the data about the incidence and impact of T1D. Leveraging data and insights from the T1D Index can help change the lives of people living with T1D by identifying attainable country-by-country interventions including timely diagnosis, accessible care and funding research that could lead to cures.
The T1D Index and accompanying research has been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

T1D is an autoimmune condition and one of the fastest-growing chronic health conditions, impacting nearly nine million people across the globe. Certain factors like family history can increase risk, but it is not caused by diet or lifestyle. T1D causes the pancreas to make very little insulin or none at all—this means the human body cannot convert food into energy, which can lead to long-term complications including damage to the kidneys, eyes, nerves, heart and even premature death. There is currently no cure for T1D.

"As a member of the T1D community, I know many are not as fortunate as I am to have the resources necessary to live a healthy and fulfilled life," Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF CEO, said. "This is why I am so proud that significant progress has been made to understand T1D's global impact through the T1D Index. We are calling on government and public health decision makers throughout the world to utilize the tool to identify and implement interventions that can change the trajectory of T1D."

JDRF collaborated with key partners and experts around the world to develop the T1D Index—using the results from a global survey of more than 500 endocrinologists and 400 publications to simulate the state of T1D globally and at the country level.

The Index uniquely illuminates the human burden of T1D by highlighting "missing people," which is the number of people who would still be alive today if they had not died early due to complications from T1D, and "healthy years lost," which represents time lost to ill-health, disability or early death from living with T1D.

Simulations from the T1D Index suggest that globally, as of 2022, there are more than 3.86 million "missing people" and an average of 32 "healthy years lost" to T1D per person, if diagnosed at age 10.

T1D presents a profound human, emotional and financial burden for those who live with it—and prevalence is on the rise. Simulations from the T1D Index have led to the identification of four key interventions that could change the current trajectory for T1D and its impact on people around the world:

Timely diagnosis: enabling better education and training for medical professionals to accurately diagnose T1D. If the global population has access to timely diagnosis from 2023, 668,000 more people could be alive in 2040.
Insulin and strips: creating barrier-free access to insulin and blood glucose testing strips. If the global population has access to insulin and testing strips from 2023, and coaching to self-manage the condition, 1.98 million more people could be alive in 2040.
Pumps and CGMs: ensuring everyone living with T1D has access to technology that automates glucose monitoring and insulin delivery. 673,000 more people could be alive in 2040 if everyone with T1D has access to the technology available from 2023.
Prevention and cures: making the case for further investment and research in emerging prevention, treatments and cures. 890,000 more people could be alive in 2040 if we find cures.
Once interventions are identified on the global and country level, the T1D Index encourages users to take action by sharing the data and findings with their networks and local decision makers, and connecting with other T1D advocates in their communities.

Additionally, the T1D Index shines a light on important statistics about the burden of T1D globally, including:

Since 2000, T1D prevalence has increased at four times the rate of global population growth.
The expected number of people living with T1D in 2040 will be 17.43 million.
The number of "missing people" in the year 2040 is projected to be 6.85 million.
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-09-global-diabetes-index.htmlXX
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Sep 20, 2022

Researchers at UVA recently published a study called Design and Validation of an Open-Source Closed-Loop Testbed for Artificial Pancreas Systems. They say what they’ve set up here is quote - a valid tool that can be used by the research community to demonstrate the effectiveness of different control algorithms and safety features for APS, automated pancreas systems.

This week, you'll hear from Xugui Zho and Homa Alemzadeh, two of the researchers on this study.

Link to the study:

https://arxiv.org/pdf/2208.06479.pdf

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

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Sep 16, 2022

It's In the News! This week's top diabetes headlines and stories include: with more cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in US kids, researchers look into whether more screenings should take place. There's a new injectable on the market that some studies show can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese people, Medtronic faces a shareholder lawsuit and a 92-yar old Long Island woman, diagnosed as a child, may be one of the oldest living people with type 1. She has some great things to say about what helps her manage well all this time!

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Sep 13, 2022

Doug Scalia has completed 25 marathons in 15 states. He’s about to add three more to his list, including the New York City Marathon as part of a team of people with type 1. He knows it sounds like an impossible feat for many, but he says anyone can do it! Doug was diagnosed as a young adult and he’s also played in the World Series of Poker so we have a lot to talk about.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Learn more about Beyond Type Run and Doug's team

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

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Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

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