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Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

The T1D news show you've been waiting for! Long-time broadcaster, blogger and diabetes mom Stacey Simms interviews prominent advocates, authors and speakers. Stacey asks hard questions of healthcare companies and tech developers and brings on "everyday' people living with type 1. Great for parents of T1D kids, adults with type 1 and anyone who loves a person with diabetes.
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Now displaying: October, 2021
Oct 29, 2021
This week, In the News our top stories include: Israeli researchers test an implant for type 2 remission, a new sports study looks at kids with type 1 on multiple daily injections, a new camera app to turn your old meter into high-tech info, the Tidepool period project, type 1 in the World Series and more!
Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

-----

Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
-----

Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go!

Episode transcription below:

Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I’m going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – we are also Live on YouTube and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast..
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In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco.
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Our top story: Lucky mice but will it work in people? Israeli scientists say they have a one-time implant that brings blood glucose into non-diabetic range. The implant is healthy tissue grown in a lab – the glucose dropped by an average of 26-percent and stayed there the four months of the study. The engineered cells absorbed sugar, improved glucose levels and also improved absorption in other muscle cells. Long way to go before this is tried in people.
https://www.timesofisrael.com/diabetes-reversed-in-mice-for-4-months-after-one-time-implant-from-israeli-lab/
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Sports and kids with type 1 can be a tough balance, especially on multiple daily injections. A new study called the Car-2-Diab trial looked at what changes work well for teens during exercise. There’s a lot here, so I’d urge you to follow the link I’ll provide, but basically everyone in this small study experienced overnight hypos and some high BG just after exercise. The most common fix was a drop in total basal insulin. These researchers say sports and type 1 have a – quote - “irreducible level of confounding factors.” Which.. from personal experience, I can say.. I agree.
https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/execise-impacts-insulin-doses-in-children-with-type-1-diabetes/
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Big new study about Medtronic’s 780G pump, available in Europe and in front of the US FDA right now. This looked at 3200 kids age 15 and younger. Time in range was 74% overall and overnight 82%. The 780G uses the Guardian Sensor 3 as a hybrid closed loop where you still bolus for meals. Overall these kids saw a 12-percent bump up in time in range.. which is a better boost than Medtronic’s first hybrid closed loop system, the 670G.
https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/medtronic-s-newest-minimed-insulin-pump-improves-glycemic-control-children-study
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Good write up about adults with type 1 which make up more than half of all new cases of type 1. This summary in the ADA publication Diabetes Care shows that there are big differences between adult and childhood onset, many of which aren’t understood. This also points out that misdiagnosis occurs in nearly 40% of adults with new type 1 diabetes, with the risk of error increasing with age.
https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/44/11/2449
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New app to retrofit a regular old blood glucose meter and make it a bit more high tech. Computer vision technology developed by University of Cambridge engineers can read and record the glucose levels, time and date displayed on a typical glucose test.. it does this with just the camera on a mobile phone. The technology, which doesn't require an internet or Bluetooth connection, works for any type of glucose meter, in any orientation and in a variety of light levels. The app is called Gluco-Rx Vision. You think about a lot of the services and programs that have popped up that require Bluetooth and remote monitoring – this helps people take advantage without having to buy a new meter.
https://www.myvetcandy.com/newsblog/2020/11/14/computer-vision-app-allows-easier-monitoring-of-diabetes
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Tidepool gets a boost for it’s Period Project… from Amazon. The Tidepool Period Project is trying to address the unmet needs of people with diabetes who menstruate. This funding from Amazon Web Services will go to supporting prototype concepts and user interface designs at Tidepool. There’s not a lot of data on diabetes and periods despite the fact that we all pretty much know anecdotally that there’s a lot going on in terms of glucose levels and hormones. Kudos to Tidepool for gathering this info for future research.
https://www.thedailytimes.com/business/diabetes-and-femtech-intersection---tidepool-receives-aws-financial-support-for-tidepool-period-project/article_7b5c40fb-3020-5428-aa0b-69ea242675ec.html
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More to come, including diabetes in the world series.. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible.
Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good
They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it’s usually after school or late night. Or sometimes it’s dinner. You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I’ll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com.
Back to the news… And it’s sports news! As of this taping the Atlanta Braves have won Game 1 of the World Series.. with Adam Duvall getting a 2-run home run. We’ve high-lighted Duvall here before.. he was diagnosed with type 1 at age 23. We’ve seen a lot of posts on social media of him taking the time to meet with families during the season, signing autographs and taking photos with his pump. Good stuff.
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And finally.. Just as the newest Apple watch was released - without blood glucose monitoring.. rumors are already swirling about the next version of the watch. As we’ve said.. you’ll know it’s real when they start clinical trials.. but Dexcom’s Chief Technology officer talked to me this week about their new agreement with Garmin and looked ahead to the G7 and possible non invasive blood glucose monitoring. Interesting stuff you can listen to wherever you get your podcasts or if you’re listening to this as a podcast, just go back an episode.
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Oct 26, 2021

With Dexcom announcing a big new agreement with Garmin this month, it seemed like a good time to check in on a few issues. Stacey talks with Dexcom’s Chief Technology Officer Jake Leach about Garmin, the upcoming Dexcom G7 and Dexcom One. She asks your questions on everything from G7 features to watch compatibility to the future and possible non invasive monitoring.

Just a reminder - the Dexcom G7 has not yet been submitted to the US FDA and is not available for use as of this episode's release.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Previous episodes with Jake Leach: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=leach

Previous episodes with CEO Kevin Sayer: https://diabetes-connections.com/?s=sayer

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

-----

Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
-----

Get the App and listen to Diabetes Connections wherever you go!

Click here for iPhone      Click here for Android

Episode transcription below:

 

Stacey Simms  0:00

Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health. Manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar, and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom.

 

Announcer  0:20

This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.

 

Stacey Simms  0:26

This week Dexcom announced a big new agreement with Garmin this month seemed like a good time to check in on a few issues, including what happens to the watches and insulin pump systems that work with G6, when Dexcom G7 it's the market.

 

Jake Leach  0:41

We're already working with Tandem and Insulet. On integrating G7 with their products have already seen prototypes up and running, they're moving as quickly as possible.

 

Stacey Simms  0:49

That's Chief Technology Officer Jake leach who reminds us that the G7 has not yet been submitted to the US FDA. He answers lots of questions on everything from G7 features to watch compatibility to the future and possible non invasive monitoring. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Welcome to another week of the show are we so glad to have you here I am the host Stacey Simms, and we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin. You know, my son Benny was diagnosed with type one right before he turned to my husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes, I have a background in broadcasting. And that is how you get the podcast. And when I saw the news about Garmin, and Dexcom. I knew you'd have some questions. And I thought this would be a good chance to talk about some of the more technical issues that we're all thinking about around Dexcom. These days.

I should note that since I did this interview with CTO Jake Leach on October 19. And that's exactly one week before this episode is being released that Dexcom released some new features for its follow app. I did cover that in my in the news segment. That was this past week, you'd find the link in the show notes. And as I see it for that news that release in the update, the big news there is that now there is a widget or quick glance on the followers home screen, it depends on your device, you know, Apple or Android, there's no tech support, right from the follow up, and a way to check the status of the servers as well. And I think that last one should really be an opt in push notification. If the servers are down, you should tell me right, I shouldn't have to wonder are the servers down and then go look, but that is the update for now. And again that came out after this interview. So I will have to ask those questions next time.

And the usual disclaimer Dexcom, as you've already heard, is a sponsor of the show, but they only pay for the commercial you will hear later on not for any of the content you hear outside of the ad. I love having them as a sponsor, because I love that Vinnie uses the product. I mean, we've used Dexcom since he was nine years old. But that doesn't mean I don't have questions for them. And I do give them credit for coming on and answering them. Not everybody does that. I should also add that this interview is a video interview, we recorded the zoom on screen stuff. You can see that at our YouTube channel. I'll link that up in the show notes if you would rather watch and there always will be a transcript these days in the show notes so lots of options for however it suits you best. I'm here to serve let me know if there's a better way for me to get this show to you. But right now we've got video audio and transcript. Alright Jake leach in just a moment.

But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario health and you know one of the things that makes diabetes management difficult for us that really annoys me and Benny, it's not really the big picture stuff. It's all the little tasks that add up. Are you sick of running out of strips do you need some direction or encouragement going forward with your diabetes management? Would visibility into your trends help you on your wellness journey? The Dario diabetes success plan offers all of that in more you don't the wavelength the pharmacy you're not searching online for answers. You don’t have to wonder about how you're doing with your blood sugar levels, find out more, go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections.

Jake leach Chief Technology Officer for Dexcom thanks so much for joining me. How are you doing?

 

Jake Leach  4:22

I'm doing great, Stacey. It's a pleasure to be here.

 

Stacey Simms  4:24

We really appreciate it. And we are doing this on video as well as audio recording as well. So if we refer to seeing things, I don't think we're sharing screens or showing product. But of course we'll let everybody know if there's anything that you need to watch or share photos of. But let me just jump in and start with the latest news which was all about Garmin. Can you share a little bit about the partnership with Garmin? What this means what people can see what's different?

 

Jake Leach  4:49

Yeah, certainly so I'm really excited to launch the partnership with Garmin. So last week we released functionality on the Dexcom side and Garmin released their products, the ability to have real time CGM readings displayed on a whole multitude of Garmin devices by computers, and a whole host of their watches. So they've got a lot of different types of watches for, you know, athletics and different things. And so you can now get real time CGM displayed on that on that watch. So they're the first partner to take advantage of some new technology that we got FDA approved earlier in the year, which is our real time cloud API. So that's a a way for companies like Garmin to develop a product that can connect up to users data through the Dexcom, secure cloud and have real time data, we've had the capability to do that with retrospective data that three hour delayed, many partners are taking advantage of that. But we just got the real time system approved. And so Garmins, the first launch with it.

 

Stacey Simms  5:50

Let me back up for just a second for those who may use these devices, but aren't as technologically focused. What is an API? When you got approval for that earlier in the summer for real time API? What does that what does that mean? Yeah, so

 

Jake Leach  6:03

it's a API is an application programming interface. And so what it really means is, it's a way for software applications, like a mobile app on your phone, to connect via the Internet to our cloud with very secure authentication, and pull your CGM data in real time from from our cloud. And so it's basically a toolkit that we provide to developers of software to be able to link their application to the Dexcom application, and really on the user side, to take advantage of that feature, you basically enter in your Dexcom credentials, your Dexcom username and password. And that is how we securely authenticate. And that's how you're basically giving access to say, for example, Garmin, to pull the data and put it down onto your devices. What other

 

Stacey Simms  6:51

apps or companies are in the pipeline for this. Can you share in addition to Garmin? I think I had seen Livongo Are there others?

 

Jake Leach  6:58

Yeah, so Livongo so Tela doc would purchase the Lubanga technology, they've got a system. They're also in the pipeline for pulling in real time CGM data into their application. And so they're all about remote care. And so trying to connect people with physicians through, you know, technology, and so having real time CGM readings in that type of environment is a really nice use case for them. And so and for the for the customers. And so that's, that's where they're headed with it. And we've got kind of a bunch more partners that are in discussions in development that we haven't announced yet. But we're really see this, the cloud API's are interfaces as a way to expand the ecosystem around a Dexcom CGM. So we really like to provide our users with choice. So how do you want your data displayed? Where do you want it? And so if you want to right place, right time for myself, have a Garmin bike computer so I can see CGM readings right on my handlebars, I don't have to, you know, look down on a watch or even thought phones, it's really convenient. That's what we're about is providing an opportunity for others to amplify the value of CGM.

 

Stacey Simms  8:06

This was a question that I got from the listener. What happens to the data? Is that a decision up to a company like Garmin, or is that part of your agreement, you know, where everybody's always worried about data privacy? And with good reason?

 

Jake Leach  8:19

Yeah, data privacy is super important area when when you're handling customer information. And so the way that it works is, when you're using our applications at the beginning, when you sign up, there's some consents, you're basically saying this is what can be done with my data. And the way we design our systems is, for example, with the connection to the Garmin devices, the only way they can access your data is if you type in your credentials into there, it's like it's almost like typing your username and password into the web to be able to access your bank account. It's the same thing, you're granting access to your data. And each company has their own consents around data. And so we all are required by regulatory agencies to stay compliant with all the different rules to Dexcom. We take it very seriously, and are very transparent about what happens with the data that's in we keep it in all of our consent forms that you click into as you as you work through the app.

 

Stacey Simms  9:13

But to be clear to use the API or to get the Dexcom numbers on your garmin, you said earlier, you have to enter your credentials,

 

Jake Leach  9:19

you have to you have to enter your Dexcom username and password. And that's how we know that it's okay for us to share that information with Garmins system because you are the one who authorized it.

 

Stacey Simms  9:30

Right. But that's also how you were going to use it. You just said you have to enter your name and password for them to use the information. So they just have to read individually like okay, Garmin or Livongo or whomever. Yes. Your individual terms of services.

 

Jake Leach  9:42

Yeah, for each each application that that you want to use you it's important to read the what they do with the data and how to use it.

 

Stacey Simms  9:49

That's really interesting. And Has anything changed with Dexcom? It's been a long time since we've talked about how you all use the data. My understanding is that it was blinded, you know, you're not turning around over to health insurers and saying yeah, done on this day this or are you?

 

Jake Leach  10:03

No, no, not at all, we basically use the information to track our product performance. So we look at products there. So it's de identified, we don't know whose product it was, we just can tell how products are performing in the field. That's a really important aspect. But we also use it to improve our products. So we when we see the issues that are occurring with the use of the product, we use it to improve it. So that's, that's our main focus. And the most important thing we do with it is provided to users where, where and when they need it. So you know, follow remote monitoring that the reason we built our data infrastructure was to provide users with features like follow and the clarity app and so forth.

 

Stacey Simms  10:36

Do those features work on other systems? Can I use Garmin to share or follow?

 

Jake Leach  10:41

Not today? So right now, it's, it's basically intended for the the person who's wearing the CGM. It's your personal CGM credentials that you type in to link the Carmen account. And so for today, it's specific around the user.

 

Stacey Simms  10:57

I assume that means you're working on for tomorrow.

 

Jake Leach  10:59

There's lots of Yeah, lots.

 

Stacey Simms  11:02

Which leads us of course to Well, I don't have to worry about that right now. Because you can't use any of this without the phone and the Phone is how we could share it follow. So it's not really an issue yet. Jake, talk to me about direct to watch to any of these watches. Yeah, where do we stand? I know G6. It's not going to happen. Where are we with G7?

Right back to Jake answering my question, you knew I was gonna bring that up. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen. And when you have diabetes and use insulin, low blood sugar can happen when you don't expect it. That's why most of us carry fast acting sugar and in the case of very low blood sugar, why we carry emergency glucagon, there's a new option called Gvoke Hypopen the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle. In usability studies. 99% of people were able to give Gvoke correctly find out more go to diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma. Visit Gvoke glucagon.com/risk now back to Dexcom’s jake leach answering my question about direct to watch

 

Jake Leach  12:19

That's a great question and a really exciting technology. So direct to watch is where through Bluetooth, the CGM wearable communicates directly to a display device like a watch. So today, G6 communicates to the phone and to insulin pumps in our receiver are the displays. With G7, what we've done is we've re architected the Bluetooth interface to be able to also in addition to communicating with an insulin pump or a receiver and your mobile phone, it can also communicate with a wearable device like a Apple Watch, in particular, but other watches have those capabilities, with G7, reducing the capability within the hardware to have the direct communication director watch. And then in a subsequent release, soon after the launch to commercial launches of G7, we'll have a release where we bring the director watch functionality to the customers, there's the Bluetooth aspect, which is really important, you got to make sure it doesn't impact battery life and other things. But there's also the aspect of when it is direct to watch, it becomes your primary display. And so being able to reliably receive alerts on the watch was something that initially in the architecture wasn't possible. But as Apple's come out with multiple versions of the OS for the watch, they've introduced capability for us, so that we can ensure you get your alerts when you're wearing the watch. And so that was a really important aspect for us. And it's also for the FDA to ensure that if that's your main display, you've walked away from your phone, you have no other device to alert you that it's going to be reliable. And so that's exciting progress of last couple years with Apple making sure that can happen. You know,

 

Stacey Simms  13:56

we're all excited for Direct to watch. Obviously, it's a feature that many people are really clamoring for. But you guys promised it first with the G five in 2017. Do you all kind of regret putting the cart before the horse that way? Because my next follow up question is why should we believe you now?

 

Jake Leach  14:15

Yeah, you know, it Stacy's a good question. So we are hand was kind of forced because Apple actually announced it before we did. So they basically said we're opening up this capability on the watch to have the direct Bluetooth connectivity. And of course, we were excited to have someone like Apple talking about CGM on that kind of a stage. But then as we got into the details of actually making it work, we, you know, continually ran into another technical challenge after another technical challenge, and I totally agree. I wish it would have been two years later that they talked about at the keynote, but I'm comfortable that we've gotten past those types of issues. And so and it is built into G7. So we've got working systems and so it will introduce it rather quickly with G7

 

Stacey Simms  14:56

and to confirm G7 has been submitted for the CE mark Because the approval in Europe, but has not yet, as you and I are speaking today has not yet been submitted for FDA approval in the US.

 

Jake Leach  15:06

Yeah, we're just we're just finishing up our submission, we get some validations that we're running on some of the new manufacturing lines to make sure we can build enough of these for all the customers, we want to focus to move over to G7 as quick as possible. And so we'll we'll submit you seven to the FDA before the end of this year,

 

Stacey Simms  15:22

just kind of building off what you mentioned about Apple and making these announcements or, you know, sometimes Apple lets news get out there. Because they I don't know if they seem to enjoy it. I'm speculating. I don't have any insight track at Apple. But I wanted to ask you, I don't know if you can say anything about this. For the last year, every time I talk to somebody who's not getting the diabetes community, but they're on a technology podcast, or they're, they're hearing things about non invasive blood glucose monitoring, right, the Apple, Apple series seven or some watch this year, we're supposed to have this incredible, non invasive glucose monitoring was gonna put Dexcom and libre out of business, it was gonna be amazing. Of course, it didn't happen. But a bunch of companies are working on this. And Apple seems to be really happy to say maybe, or we're working on it, too, is Dexcom listening to these things. I mean, obviously, they're not here yet. They they are going to come. I'm curious if this is all you kind of happy to let that lay out their speculation. Or if you guys are thinking about anything like this in the future,

 

Jake Leach  16:17

we pay a lot of attention to non invasive technologies. We have a an investment component of our company that looks at you know, early stage startups. We also have many partnership discussions around CGM technologies. And so when it comes to non invasive, I think we'd all love to have non invasive sensors that are accurate and reliable. You know, for many, many years since I've been working on CGM, and many years before that, there has been attempts to make a non invasive technologies work. The challenge, though, is it's just sensing glucose in the human body with a non invasive technology is not been proven feasible. It's just there's a lot of different attempts and technologies have tried, and we pay close attention. Because if if something started to show promise, we become very interested in it. And basically making a Dexcom product that uses it, we just haven't seen anything that is accurate and reliable enough for what our customers need. That's to say, there could be a use case where a non invasive sensor doesn't have to be as accurate and reliable as what what Dexcom does. And so maybe there's a product there. But we're very focused on ensuring that the accurate, the numbers that we show, the glucose readings that we present to users are highly accurate, highly reliable, that you can trust them. And so when it comes to non invasive, we just haven't seen a technology that can do that. But I know that there's lots of folks out there working on it. And we're, we stay very close to the community.

 

Stacey Simms  17:40

Yeah, one of the examples I gave a guy who doesn't he does an Apple technology podcast, and he was like, you know, what, what do you think? And I said, Well, here's an example. He would a scale, and you have no idea if it's accurate. But you know, that once you step on it that that number probably is is stable, then you know, okay, I gained 10 pounds, I lost 10 pounds. But I have no idea if that beginning number makes any sense at all, you might be able to use that if you are a pre diabetic, or if you're worried about blood glucose, but you could never dose insulin using it because you have no idea where you're starting. So I think that's I mean, my lay person speculation. I think that's where that technology is now and to that point, but other people outside the diabetes community are looking to one of the more interesting stories, I think, in the last year or two has been use of CGM and flash glucose monitoring for people without diabetes at all, for athletes, for people who are super excited and interested in seeing what their body's doing. So we have companies like levels and super sapient. And you know, that kind of thing using the Liebreich. I'm curious of a couple of parts of this question. If you think you want to answer it is Dexcom. Considering any of those partnerships with the G7, which is much more simple, right? fewer parts and that kind of thing.

 

Jake Leach  18:46

Yeah, that's a great point, Stacey. So yes, G7 is a lot simpler. It was designed to be to take the CGM experience to the next level. And part of that is just the ease of use the product deployment the simplicity, someone who's never seen a CGM before, we want to be able to walk up approach G7 And just use it. There's a lot of opportunity we feel for glucose sensing outside of diabetes. Today CGM are indicated for use in diabetes, but in the future, with 30% of the adult population in the US having pre diabetes, meaning the glucose levels are elevated, but not to the point where they've been diagnosed with diabetes. There's just so much opportunity to help people understand their blood sugar and how it impacts lifestyle choices impact their blood sugar. In the immediate feedback you get from a CGM is just a there's nothing else like it. And so I think, you know, pre diabetes and even as you mentioned, kind of in athletics. There's a lot of research going on right now in endurance athletes, and in weight loss around using CGM readings for those different aspects. So I think there's a lot opportunity we're today we're focused on diabetes, both type one and type two and really getting technology to people around the globe. That can benefit from it. That's where our focus is. But we very much have programs where we look at, okay, where else could we use CGM? It's such a powerful tool, you could think in the hospital, there's so much opportunity around around glucose. Alright, so I'm

 

Stacey Simms  20:13

gonna give you my idea that I've given to the levels people, and they liked it, but then they dropped off the face of the earth. So I'll be contacting them again. Here's my idea. If somebody wants to pay for a CGM, and they don't have diabetes, but they're like paying out of pocket because they like their sleep tracker, and they like this and they like that, or some big companies gonna buy it and give it away for weight loss or whatever. You know, the the shoe company toms, where you buy a pair of shoes and they give one away. People are in the diabetes community are scrimping and saving and doing everything they can to get a CGM. Maybe we could do a program like that. Where if you don't quote unquote medically need a CGM. Your purchase could also help purchase one for an underserved clinic that serves people with diabetes.

 

Jake Leach  20:54

Getting CGM to those folks that didn't need them, particularly underserved areas, clinics. It's so important. I like the idea. It's a that's if there was a cache component that then provided the CGM to those that are less fortunate. I think that's, I like the idea. Next month is National Diabetes Awareness Month. And one of the things we're focused on for the month of November is how can we bring broader access to CGM? It's something we've been working on, you know, since we had our first commercial product, and there's still, you know, many people in the United States benefit, you know, 99% of in private insurance covers the product. You know, a lot of our customers don't pay anything, they have no copay. But you know, that's not the case for everybody. And so there's, there's definitely areas that we need to we are focusing on some of our non profit partners on bringing that type of greater access to CGM, because it's such a powerful tool and helping you live a more normal life.

 

Stacey Simms  21:50

In the couple of minutes that we have left. I had a couple more questions, mostly about G7. But you mentioned your hospital use. And last year, I remember talking to CEO Kevin Sayer about Dex comes new hospital program, which I believe launched during COVID. Do you have any kind of update on that or how it's been going?

 

Jake Leach  22:06

Yeah, so it was a authorization that we got from the FDA to raise special case during COVID, to be able to use G6 in the hospital. And so we had quite a few hospitals contact us early on in COVID, saying, Hey, we've got these patients, many of them have diabetes, they're on steroids. They're in the hospital, and we're trying to manage their glucose. And we're having a hard time because their standard of care in hospitals is either labs or finger sticks. And so we got this authorization with the FDA, we ship the product, many hospitals acquired it, and they were using it pretty successfully. What we'd say about G6 is really designed for personal use your mobile phone or a little receiver device, designed integrated with a hospital patient monitoring system or anything like that. You could imagine in the future that that could be a real strong benefit for CGM, the hospital, you can imagine you put it on, you know, anybody who has glucose control issues comes in the door. And then you basically can help ensure where resources need to be directed based on you know, glucose risk. I've always been passionate about CGM at a hospital. It's one of the early projects I worked on here. Dexcom. And I think it there's a lot of promise, particularly as we've improved the technology. So there's still hospitals today using G 600 of the authorization. And we're interested in designing a product for that market specifically, instead of right now. It's kind of under emergency years. But we think there's there's a great need there. That CGM could could help in basically glucose control in the hospital.

 

Stacey Simms  23:28

That's interesting, too. Of course, my mind being a mom went to camp as well. Right? If you could have a bunch of people I envision like a screen or you know, hospital monitoring that kind of thing. You wonder if you could do something at camp where there's 100 kids, you know, instead of having their individual phones or receivers at camp, it would be somewhere Central?

 

Jake Leach  23:46

Well, you know, what, between with the with the real time API, there are folks that are thinking about a camp monitoring system that can basically be deployed on campuses right now with follow. It's great for a family, but it's not really designed to, to follow a whole camp full of campers. But with the real time API, there's opportunities for others to develop an application that could be used like that. So yeah, there you go.

 

Stacey Simms  24:08

All right, a couple of G7 questions. The one I got mostly from listeners was how soon and I know, timelines can be tricky. But how soon will devices that use the G6? Will they be able to integrate the G7 Insulin pumps, that sort of thing? Sure. It's only Tandem right now. But you know, Omnipod, soon that that kind of thing?

 

Jake Leach  24:26

Yeah, I mean, that's coming. So I'll start with the digital partners like Garmin and others, that is going to be seamless, because the infrastructure that G6 utilizes to move data to through the API's is the same with G7. So that'll be seamless. When you talk about insulin pumps, so those are the ones that are directly connected to our transmitters that are taking the glucose readings for automated insulin delivery. So those systems were already working with Tandem and Insulet. On integrating G7 with their products have already seen prototypes up and running so they're moving as quickly as possible. So once We have G7 approved, then they can go in and go through their regulatory cycle to get G7 approved for us with their AI D algorithms. Really the timing is dictated mainly by those partners and the FDA, but we're doing everything we can to support them to ensure this as quick as possible.

 

Stacey Simms  25:17

Take I should have asked at the beginning, I'm so sorry, do you live with type one I've completely forgotten.

 

Jake Leach  25:21

I don't I made a reference to where I wear them all the time. Because, as you know, kind of leading the r&d team here, I love to experience the products and understand what our users what their experience is. And I just love learning about my glucose readings in the different activities I do. So I don't have type one. But I just I use the products all the time.

 

Stacey Simms  25:42

So to that end, have you worn the G7? And I guess I'd love to know a little bit more about ease of use. It looks like it's, it just looks like it's so simple.

 

Jake Leach  25:51

It is. Yeah. So I've participated in a couple of clinical trials where we use G7, it is really simple. One of the most exciting things though, I have to say is that when you put it on, it has this 30 minute warmup. So the two hours that we've all been used to for so many years, by the time you put the device on and you have it paired your phone, it's there's like 24 minutes left before you're getting CGM. So it's like it's it. That part is just one of the things that you it sounds awesome. But then when you actually experience it, it's pretty amazing. But yeah, the ease of use is great, because it's the applicator is simple. It's a push button like G sex where you just press the button and it deploys. But there's other steps where you're not having to remove adhesive liners, the packaging is very, very small. So we really focused on low environmental footprint. And so it's really straightforward. But probably the most the really significant simplification the application process is because the transmitter and the sensor all one component and sterilized and saying altogether, there's no pieces, there's no assembly required, you basically take the device and apply it and then it's up and running. There's no transmitted a snap in or two pieces to assemble before you you do the insertion.

 

Stacey Simms  26:59

I think I know the answer to this. But I wanted to ask anyway, was it when you applied for the CE mark? And I assume this would be the same for the FDA? Are there alternate locations? In other words, can we use it on our arms?

 

Jake Leach  27:11

And yeah, that is that is a great question. Yeah, our focus with one of our phones with G7 and the revised form factor, the new new smaller form factor and sensor probe was arm were so yeah, arm wears is really important part of the G7 product.

 

Stacey Simms  27:26

I got a question about Dexcom. One, which seems to be a less expensive product with fewer features that's available in Europe. Is that what Dexcom? One is?

 

Jake Leach  27:34

Yeah, so there's a product that we recently launched in Europe in European countries. That is it's called Dexcom. One. And what it is, is it's it's a product that's designed for a broad segment of diabetes, type one, type two, it's a lower price point. It has a reduced feature set from G6. But what it's really about is simplicity. And so in you know it's a available through E commerce solutions. So it's really easy to acquire the product and start using it. It's really to get into certain markets where we either weren't didn't have access to certain customers. And so it's really designed for get generating access for large groups of people that didn't have access to CGM before.

 

Stacey Simms  28:20

What does e commerce solution mean? No doctor

 

Jake Leach  28:23

there. So outside the United States CGM isn't no prescription required for many, many countries. So the US is one of the countries that does require prescriptions, other some other countries do too. But there's a large group outside the US that don't, but it's really around, you can basically go to the website, and you can purchase it over a website. So really kind of nice solution around think Amazon, right. You're going you're clicking on add the sensors and you're purchasing it. It's a exciting new product for us that we are happy to continue developing.

 

Stacey Simms  28:53

I think it might come to the US don't know. Yeah, that's

 

Jake Leach  28:56

good. Good question. Don't don't know. I mean, I think right now we see CGM coverage is so great access is great for CGM in the US it can always be better and extend your focus on that. But it's really for countries where there wasn't access,

 

Stacey Simms  29:08

I would think tough to since we do need a prescription differently. Yeah, Jake, you have been with Dexcom, almost 20 years, 18 years now. And a lot has changed. When you're looking back. And looking forward here at Dexcom. I don't really expect you to come up with some words of wisdom off the top of your head. But it's got to be pretty interesting to see the changes that the technology has brought to the diabetes community and how I don't know it just seems from where I sit and you're probably a couple of years ahead. It seems that the last five years have just been lightspeed. It has

 

Jake Leach  29:39

been things are speeding up in terms of our ability to bring products to market and there's a lot of things one is the development of technology. The other component is working with your groups like the FDA on you know, how do we get products to the customers as fast as possible and that that's been a big part of it right moving cheese six to class to becoming an IC GM that That was a huge part of our ability to get the technology out quickly and also scale it. I think there's a lot of aspects that has been faster. And you know, when I started Dexcom, we had this goal of designing a CGM that was reliable didn't require finger sticks that could make treatment decisions. All that and we were 100% focused on that. And as we got closer and closer, and now we have that which you six and also what you seven, then the opportunity that that product can provide, you start to really understand how impactful CGM can be around the world. And that's what I'm excited about now is I'm still excited about the technology always will be and we still have lots to do on making it better, more reliable and more integrated. But just how much CGM can do around around the globe. There's just so many things. It's beyond diabetes to so very excited about the future.

 

Stacey Simms  30:47

Many thanks, as always, and we'll talk soon, I am sure but I mean, I could never get to say it enough. I can't imagine doing the teenage years with my son without Dexcom. You guys, I know you did it just for me. You did it just in time. Appreciate it very much. He is doing amazing. And I can't he would not be sticking his fingers 10 times a day. So thank you.

 

Jake Leach  31:05

That's great to hear. Thanks, Stacy.

 

Announcer  31:12

You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.

 

Stacey Simms  31:18

As always more information at diabetes connections.com. And yeah, but that last bit there, I can say nice things. I mean, I really do feel that way. And I can still ask not so nice questions. Like if you're new, quite often, I will open up a thread in our Facebook group. It's Diabetes Connections of the group to gather questions for our guests. And I did that here with Dexcom, there's usually quite a lot of questions, I do have to apologize, I missed a big one. Because of the timing of the interview, I promise I will circle back around next time I talk to Dexcom. And that is all about the updates for iOS and for new phones, and how you know, sometimes Dexcom is behind the updates. What I mean by that is that they lag behind the updates. So you can go to the Dexcom website, I'll put a link up for this for Dexcom products that are compatible in terms of which iOS and that kind of thing. And they are behind. And Dexcom will always say they've said very publicly that they are working hard to catch up. But I guess the question that a few people really wanted to know was why, you know, why do they lag behind? What can be done about that? So they know, but I think it would be a good question to ask. So Sarah and others. I appreciate you sending that question. And I apologize that I didn't get to it this time around.

And I'll tell you, you know, it's not something we've experienced, but I think it has to do and I'm speculating here more with the phone with the the newness and the the model of the phone sometimes then for the updates, especially if you don't have your updates on automatic. So I guess I'm kind of saying the same thing. But what I mean by that is Vinny, and I have very old phones. I have an eight. I'm not even sure he has the eight. We are terrible parents and I don't care about my phone, I would still have a Blackberry if that were possible. So I can't commiserate. I'm so embarrassed to even tell you that I can commiserate with the updates, because it's just not something that we have done. Benny, definitely if he were here, trust me. It's like his number. I would say it's his number one complaint that it's really high up on the list of complaints to the parenting department in our house. And yes, Hanukkah is coming. His birthday is coming. There will be some new phones around here. I'm doing an upgrade. I'm sure both of us have cracked phones. Were the worst. Oh, my goodness.

All right. Well, more to come in just a moment. But first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. And this is the ad I was talking about earlier in the interest of full disclosure. But you know, one of the most common questions I get is about helping kids become more independent. I get asked this all the time at conferences for virtual chats in my local group. These transitional times are tricky. And we've gone through this preschool to elementary elementary to middle middle to high school. I can't speak high school to college yet, but you using the Dexcom really makes a big difference. For us. It's not all about sharing follow, although that's very, very helpful. Just think about how much easier it is for a middle schooler to look at their Dexcom rather than do four to five finger sticks at school, or for a second grader to just show their care teams a number. Here's where I am right before Jim. At one point, Ben, he was up to 10 finger sticks a day, he didn't have Dexcom until the end of fourth grade not having to do that made his management a lot easier for him. It's also a lot easier to spot the trends and use the technology to give your kids more independence. Find out more at diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo.

I don't know about you, but I am getting a ton of email already about Diabetes Awareness Month and that is November this time of year I usually get I'd say 120 emails that are not snake oil, right one in 20 emails that maybe make sense for something we want to talk about on the show here that I would share on social media and I'm just inundated with nonsense. So I hope you are not as well. But I gotta say Diabetes Awareness Month this year. I've been pulling in My local group and talking about what to do because usually I highlight a lot of people and stories and I'll I'll still do that, I think, but I got to tell you people are, um, you know, this, we're all stressed out. And while it's a wonderful thing to educate, I always think Diabetes Awareness Month is not for the diabetes community, right? We are plenty aware of diabetes, this is a chance to educate other people. And that's why I like sharing those pictures and stories on my page, because the families then can share that with their people. And it's about educating people who don't have diabetes. But gosh, I don't know this year, I'm going to be just concentrating on putting out the best shows that I can

I do you have a new project I mentioned last week that we're going to be talking about in the Facebook group. By the time this airs, I will have the webinars scheduled in the Facebook group. So very excited about that. Please check it out. But what are you doing for Diabetes Awareness Month? If you've got something you'd like me to amplify, please let me know. You can email me Stacey at diabetes connections.com. Or you can direct message me on the social media outlet of your choice. We are at YouTube, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. That's where Diabetes Connections lives. I'm on Tik Tok, or Snapchat or Pinterest. Oh my gosh. All right. Well, that will do it for this week. Thanks as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions.

Thank you so much for listening. I will be back on Wednesday. live within the news. Live on Facebook and now on YouTube as well. Until then, be kind to yourself.

Benny:

Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Oct 22, 2021

This week "In the News.." our top stories include: New features for Dexcom Follow, Vertex makes stem cell progress on a functional cure for type 1, funding comes through for a eye scan for glucose levels, a new aggregate diet/nutrition study measures T1D risk in babies, Medtronic snaps up a patch pump company and a lot more..

Join us LIVE every Wednesday at 4:30pm ET for the top diabetes headlines of the week.

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

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Episode Transcription below:

 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I’m going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and new this week – Live on YouTube..  and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule.

XX

In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco.

XX

Earlier today, Dexcom released some new features for its Follow app. It now includes a Homescreen Widget to an Apple device, a Quick Glance for Android users. You can submit a Technical Support Request or Request a Callback via Follow’s Contact Menu. I assume that means you can request replacement sensors from within the app?

And you can Access the Status page via Follow’s Help Menu to check the status of any of the Dexcom systems. This is version 4.4 of Dexcom Follow and only applies to US users.

XX

Some news in the stem cell race – a few companies now looking at this as a practical cure for type 1. Vertex announced that the first patient in its islet cell replacement therapy is doing well – with a lower A1C and less insulin needs. The person is on immunosuppressive therapy and does still need to use insulin – although 90-percent less. This caught my eye - this person was diagnosed 40 years ago – this isn’t a recent diagnosis. They also had incredible hypoglycemia, up to 5 episodes a day and pretty much have their life back now. One person does not make a cure but it’s good to see these therapies moving forward. You may recall Vertex acquired Semma and joins ViaCyte which has an encapsulated stem cells – the hope for all long-term is that no immune suppressants would be needed.

https://www.biospace.com/article/vertex-s-type-1-diabetes-therapy-shows-promise-in-early-stage-trial/

XX

A new eye scan that could help diagnose diabetes is moving ahead. British-based startup Occuity has received investment funding for the Occuity Indigo, a non-contact, optical glucose meter.. The company says it’s different from the failed Google contact lens… the Google version measured fluid.. but the Occuity looks within the eyeball. The company says quote - it is a transparent, stable environment whose glucose levels correlate with those of the blood.

The Occuity Indigo sends a faint beam of light into the eyeball and measures the light that bounces back into the device. It can infer glucose levels in the eye based on the refraction of the returning light.

https://www.uktech.news/featured/eye-scan-for-diabetes-berkshire-startup-is-developing-revolutionary-medical-technology-with-285m-funding-20211019

XX

Medtronic’s in talks to snap up what sounds like a pretty advanced patch pump from an Israeli company called Triple Jump. The Triple Jump system has a compact, fully portable, battery-operated miniature insulin pump and hand-held controller and includes all supporting accessories and sterile single-use disposables. The release here says it will be included in a future artificial pancreas system and that Medtronic plans to integrate Triple Jump's device to improve its pumping capabilities.

 

https://en.globes.co.il/en/article-medtronic-in-talks-to-buy-israeli-co-triple-jump-for-300m-1001387534

XX

No surprise but important info – using a flash glucose moniotor can improve A1Cs and reduce DKA cases. Big study in Scotland using the Libre – called a flash monitor because this version isn’t continuous – you have to swipe to see your glucose. The technology has been free in Scotland since 2018 – so use in people with type 1 went from about 3 percent in 2017 to 46 percent in 2020. Improvement was seen across all ages, genders and socio-economic lines. Also.,regardless of prior or current pump use, completion of a diabetes education program, or early flash monitoring adoption.

https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/flash-glucose-monitoring-lowers-hba1c-rates-of-dka-in-patients-with-type-1-diabetes

XX

Controversial but more research into preventing type 1.. new studies showing that longer breastfeeding and later introduction to gluten may reduce the risk. This was a look at aggregate studies in Sweden.. which has the second highest incidence of type 1 in the world. (number one is Finland – I knew you were going to ask)

For babies nursed for at least six to 12 months, the risk of developing type 1 went down 61 percent. Gluten at three to six months of age lowered the risk 64 percent. The studies also pointed to a protective effect of vitamin D supplementation during infancy. These researchers are careful to say that this isn’t definitive but instead points to the need for more studies of babies’ diet and vitamin intake and the risk of type 1.

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20211018/Breastfeeding-and-later-introduction-to-gluten-may-have-a-protective-effect-against-type-1-diabetes.aspx

XX

Some early news about type 1 diabetes, pregnancy and the gut microbiome. This study shows pregnant women with type 1 had a decrease in "good" gut bacteria and an increase in 'bad' gut bacteria that promote intestinal inflammation and damage to the intestinal lining. These changes could contribute to the increased risk of pregnancy complications seen in women with type 1

This is very early on.. the next stage of the project was to identify markers that would determine which women with type 1 diabetes might benefit from safe interventions during pregnancy, including dietary changes.

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2021-10-dietary-pregnancy-complications-women-diabetes.html

 

XX

More to come, including mental health help and a bit of a correction on my part. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible.

Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good

They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it’s usually after school or late night. He ate like four waffles at ten o clock at night the other day. You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I’ll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com.

Back to the news…

--

We talk a lot about mental health and diabetes and how there just aren’t enough resources to help. I want to call your attention to a free virtual workshop by the Center for Diabetes and Mental Health. This is tomorrow as you watch me live – and if you’re listening or watching after I’d still urge you to check out the resources. This is from Dr. Mark Heyman who I’ve had on the show and who has his own podcast. Dr. Heyman is a diabetes psychologist and Certified Diabetes Care and Education Specialist and he lives with type 1.

https://cdmh.org/

https://www.reimaginet1d.com/c/reimagine-t1d?fbclid=IwAR1dsPn5wefVM3vnypUgRuBf8OA9qL-suMKlbdPZeASRXDyFuneTAYQ3igw

XX

Bit of a correction to last week’s news.. I had speculated whether the Dexcom/Garmin partnership which uses the name Connect IQ had anything to do with Tandem’s Control IQ. I heard from a lot of you – apparently Garmin’s whole app system is just called Connect IQ.. and has been for years. But I did get that interview with Dexcom I mentioned.. so that will be our long-format interview episode coming up on Tuesday. That’s a chat with the chief technology officer of dexcom

The episode out right now is all about Halloween – it’s an ask the d mom conversation with my wonderful friend moira mccarthy. We talk about everything from candy to getting your kids insulin pump under the costume to sugar free candy from well meaning neighbors

That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Oct 19, 2021

The first Halloween when your child has diabetes can seem impossible, but the D-Moms are here to help! Stacey & Moira McCarthy answer listener questions and share stories about their experiences. They can help make Halloween less scary, more fun and show you that there are a lot of options for your family.

Stacey also shares some thoughts about her trip to the She Podcasts LIVE! conference last week.

(The Halloween conversation first aired in 2019)

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

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Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
-----

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Episode Transcription coming soon: 

Oct 15, 2021

Top stories this week include: a new adjunct therapy is being tested for type 1, Dexcom and Garmin will officially work together (no more DIY needed), once weekly basal insulin study, can psychedelic drugs prevent type 2?! and Australia bets on Rugby for diabetes education

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

-----

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Episode transcription below: 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and I am on location this week. I’m at the She Podcasts LIVE conference.. but the news doesn’t wait. So.. these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I’m going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule.
XX
In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their breakfast line and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco.
XX
Our top story.. There’s a lot of buzz these days around adjunct therapy for diabetes.. basically another treatment along with insulin. Earlier this year, a drug so far just named TTP-399 got FDA breakthrough therapy approval. A new study shows it works well to keep people with type 1 out of DKA. This was small study, 23 people. They found that TTP-399 can help lower blood glucose without increasing the risk of DKA.
It’s important because other adjunct therapy.. such as S-G-L-T-2 inhibitors do help lower blood glucose, but the FDA has said they cause too much of a risk of DKA in people with type 1. Those are brand names like Invokana and Jardiance.
Pivotal trials of TTP-399 begin later this year.
https://www.biospace.com/article/vtv-therapeutics-type-1-diabetes-drug-shows-promise/
XX
New partnership announced today - Dexcom and Garmin. You will still need your phone.. I knew you were going to ask.. but with the new Dexcom Connect IQ apps you can now see your Dexcom G6 info on your compatible Garmin smartwatch or cycling computer.
Jake Leach, chief technology officer at Dexcom says.. Garmin is the first partner to connect through the real-time API, which we told you about a few months back.
Basically, you’ll be seeing more connectivity without having to use a third party, community sourced work around which a lot of people do now.
The name here is interesting, right? Connect IQ, very similar to Tandem’s Control IQ. But since Dexcom owns a bit of Tandem, maybe that’s no coincidence. I’ve requested an interview with Dexcom so maybe we’ll find out.

garmin.com/newsroom, email media.relations@garmin.com, or follow us at facebook.com/garmin, twitter.com/garminnews, instagram.com/garmin, youtube.com/garmin or linkedin.com/company/garmin.
XX
New study about time in range, hybrid closed loop systems and faster insulins. The headline here is that using Fiasp with the Medtronic 670g system resulted in greater time in range. How much? The Fiasp group spend 82 point 3 percent time in range.. the Novolog group spent 79.6 percent time in range. This was over 17 weeks and the participants mostly bolused AT meal times, not before, no prebolusing. The researchers echo what I was going to say here, quote – “While the primary outcome demonstrated statistical significance, the clinical impact may be small, given an overall difference in time in range of 1.9%.”
So just a heads up if you see headlines screaming about how much faster Fiasp is because of this study.
https://www.endocrinologyadvisor.com/home/topics/diabetes/type-1-diabetes/fast-acting-insulin-aspart-versus-insulin-aspart-closed-loop-type-1-diabetes/
XX
People who have tried a psychedelic drug at least once in their lifetime have lower odds of heart disease and diabetes. This is a University of Oxford study published in Scientific Reports.
These researchers examined data from more than 375-thousand Americans who had taken part in an annual survey sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
Participants reported whether they had ever used the classic psychedelic substances including LSD, mescaline, peyote or psilocybin. They also reported whether they had been diagnosed with heart disease or diabetes in the past year.
The researchers found that the prevalence of both conditions was lower among psychedelic users.
While no one is recommending you start taking mushrooms to avoid diabetes.. there’s a growing push to start serious research to investigate the link between psychedelics and cardio-metabolic health.
https://www.psypost.org/2021/10/psychedelic-use-associated-with-lower-odds-of-heart-disease-and-diabetes-study-finds-61958
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Update on the once a week basal insulin I’ve been reporting on for a while.. both Lilly and Novo Nordisk are testing their own version of this.. this most recent study looks at the Lilly version called Tirzepatide. These researchers found it to be safe and effective with lower rates of hypoglycemia and slightly lower A1Cs than daily basals like Lantus or Tresiba.
Lots of studies ongoing here, for both brands of potential once a week dosing, including a large phase 2 program that includes people with type 1.
https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20211012/novel-onceweekly-basal-insulin-safe-effective-in-type-2-diabetes
XX
More to come, including how rugby and diabetes education may go together.. But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible.
Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good
They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—we really like their breakfast line.. although Benny rarely eats the waffles or breakfast sandwiches for breakfast.. it’s usually after school or late night. Ugh.. do your teens eat breakfast? You can buy Real Good Foods online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I’ll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com.
Back to the news…
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Getting out of the doctor’s office and into something that people can actually relate to.. Diabetes Australia is using rugby to teach men about the risks of type 2 diabetes.
League Fans in Training (League-FIT) is based on a Scottish initiative that used football teams to deliver exercise and nutritional advice to overweight and obese men.
The program includes education and goal setting and a rugby league-based exercise session, delivered by coaches and some of the club’s players. What I really like about this is that -from what I can tell - they’re focusing on small changes and not telling these guys to give up everything they like to eat and drink or that they have to become professional players to get a little bit more fit.
Imagine if NFL players had a clinic for fans to come and learn a little bit about fitness and nutrition? Again, not to be pros.. just to live a little better and lower risks of type 2.
https://www.diabetesaustralia.com.au/news
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On Diabetes Connections this week, we’re talking to a mom with type 1 who has had two children during the pandemic. One last summer and the other just a few days before our interview!
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Oct 12, 2021

Pregnancy with type 1 is never simple, but this week's guest faced an unusual complication. Vanessa Messenger has had two babies during the COVID pandemic! Vanessa, who lives with T1D, gave birth to her daughter in the summer of 2020. She just had another baby - 15 days before our interview.

Her new book is launching this month. Called, "Teddy Talks: A Paws-itive Story About Type 1 Diabetes" it features a little dog who helps explain what kids should know about check glucose, using a CGM, taking insulin and a lot more. Teddy is modeled after Vanessa's real-life dog, who already looks like a character in a children's book.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.
.

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Episode Transcription coming soon

Oct 8, 2021
It's "In the News..." the only LIVE diabetes newscast! Top stories this week: Medtronic expands its insulin pump recall, Afrezza inhaled insulin pediatric studies to begin, new report says adults w/T1D are a "Forgotten population," new research into type 2 diabetes and statins and more!
Join us each Wednesday at 4:30pm EDT live at https://www.facebook.com/diabetesconnections

 

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

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Episode transcript below:

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days. As always, I’m going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule.
XX
In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their Entrée Bowls and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco.
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Our top story this week.. Medtronic has expanded a recall of its MiniMed 600 series insulin pumps to include nearly half a million devices. This is an FDA Class One recall – the most serious type – because the pumps may deliver incorrect insulin doses.
The recall was first announced in 2019 for just two models. Medtronic now says it will replace any MiniMed 600 series insulin pump that has a clear retainer ring with one that has the updated black retainer ring at no charge. That’s even if there is no damaged and regardless of the warranty status of the pump.
There’s more to this – including directions on how to check if your pump may be affected and who to call. I’ll put all of that here in the FB comments and in the show notes.
https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2021-10-05/medtronic-expands-recall-to-include-more-than-463-000-insulin-pumps
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Enrollment is under way for the first pediatric trials for Afrezza inhalable insulin. This will involve children ages 4 to 17 living with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. It’s called the INHALE-1 phase three trial. They’re going to look at changes in A1C after 26 weeks.. and then changes in fasting glucose after another 26 weeks. If you’re interested, we’ve got the link for more info to this study and to learn about enrollment. Afrezza was approved for adults back in 2014.
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04974528.
https://investors.mannkindcorp.com/news-releases/news-release-details/mannkind-announces-first-patient-enrolled-inhale-1-study
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Last week we told you about the Glucagon emergency kit recall from Lilly. Reuters is reporting that the kits were made in a factory previously cited for quality-control violations, including several involving the glucagon product.
Lilly had received a report of a patient who experienced seizures even after being injected with the drug, a sign that glucagon was not potent enough to work. The company said the product failure might be related to its manufacturing process, without elaborating.
A spokesperson declined to say whether Lilly has received other reports of adverse events related to the Glucagon kits.
Separately, Lilly is facing a federal criminal investigation into alleged manufacturing irregularities involving another of its U.S. factories in New Jersey. Reuters is following both stories and of course, we will too.
https://www.reuters.com/business/healthcare-pharmaceuticals/exclusive-eli-lillys-recalled-emergency-diabetes-drug-came-plant-cited-by-fda-2021-10-04/
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Big new report on adults with type 1.. called a forgotten population in this write up. The consensus statement covers diagnosis, goals and targets, schedule of care, self-management education and lifestyle, glucose monitoring, insulin therapy, hypoglycemia, psychosocial care and much more.
This is a joint statement from the American Diabetes Association and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes Their last consensus report on type 2 diabetes has been "highly influential," these researchers say.. so they recognize the need to develop a comparable report specifically addressing type 1 diabetes in adults.
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/960158
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Adults with Type 2 diabetes on statin therapy may see worsening diabetes symptoms. Important caution: the researchers are quick to say that association does not prove causation, no patient should just stop taking their statins based on this study. These are cholesterol lowering medications with brand names like Lipitor and Crestor..
Statin users had a 37% higher risk for diabetes progression, including extremely high blood sugar levels and elevated rates of disease complications. Nearly half of adults with Type 2 diabetes also have high cholesterol and many of them stop taking statins due to this kind of thing. But that may increase the risk for heart attack or stroke. So definitely talk to your doctor before making any changes.
https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2021/10/04/statins-diabetes-progression-risk-study/7261633358483/
XX
More to come, But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible.
Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good
They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—the new Entrée bowls are great. They have a chicken burrito, a cauliflower mash and braised beef bowl.. the lemon chicken I’ve told you about and more! They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I’ll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com.
Back to the news…
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DreaMed Diabetes gets FDA approval to expand their platform to people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Called Advisor Pro, it’s the first decision support system that has been cleared to assist healthcare providers in the management of diabetes patients who use insulin as well as CGMs and meters. We spoke to these folks on the podcast last year. They say Advisor Pro aims to solve the massive worldwide shortage of endocrinologists by empowering primary care clinicians, to be able to provide expert level endocrinological care to diabetes patients. The company’s founder says the next step is to develop and extend the technology to cover all injectable or oral medications for diabetes.
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211006005640/en/
https://diabetes-connections.com/we-treat-the-data-lifting-the-burden-of-diabetes-with-dreamed/
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Really interesting look at who’s adopting newer diabetes technology. This is from an article over at Dia Tribe where they feature a research study showing that roughly 55% of people with diabetes had positive, open attitudes toward technology. However, another 20% had negative attitudes and did not trust technology, while the remaining 25% either did not want additional data, did not want to wear a device on their body or had a very high level of diabetes distress related to using devices.
When they focused on people with type 2.. it turns out the uptake of technology was actually lowest among people aged 18 to 25. This group also had the highest levels of diabetes distress and the highest A1C levels, and many reported that they did not like having a device on their body as their main reason for refusing the devices. Others reported the frequency of alerts and alarms, feeling physically uncomfortable, and cost as reasons for rejecting devices.
These researchers say providers need to find ways to avoid making patients feel guilty about their choice of technology as well as watching out for negative judgements for those who use devices but don’t achieve near perfect glucose control.
https://diatribe.org/new-tech-and-psychological-toll-diabetes-management
Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode - The episode out right now is all about the film Pay or Die an upcoming documentary about insulin access and affordability. –
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Oct 5, 2021

There's a new documentary in the works, all about the struggle of insulin access and affordability. Rachael Dyer and Scott Ruderman, who lives with type 1, join Stacey to talk about their experience making this film and why they think it could make a difference.

Pay or Die Film provides an inside look at how the soaring price of insulin in America is threatening—and even taking—the lives of people with type 1 diabetes.
This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

-----

Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
-----

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Episode Transcription coming soon!

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Stacey Simms  0:00

Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health manage your blood glucose levels increase your possibilities by Gvoke Hypopen the first premixed auto injector for very low blood sugar and by Dexcom take control of your diabetes and live life to the fullest with Dexcom.

 

Announcer  0:22

This is Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms.

 

Stacey Simms  0:27

This week, a new documentary in the works to show people outside the diabetes community the struggle of insulin access and affordability. Rachael Dyer and Scott Ruderman had an experience in Canada that made them say, we got to do this,

 

Rachael Dyer  0:42

where he was paying at home in America up to $450 a vial out of pocket then to have the same vial same manufacturer same everything brought to him for $21 in Canada and to watch Scott just break down and start crying there in the pharmacy and for myself as well. I was left in shock and disbelief, and we just looked at each other as we walked out and said it's time now to make this documentary.

 

Stacey Simms  1:11

We'll talk to Rachael and Scott who lives with type one about their experience making this film and why they think it could make a difference. This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Welcome to another week of the show always so glad to have you here. You know we aim to educate and inspire about diabetes with a focus on people who use insulin and insulin access and affordability as you heard is what this week's episode is all about. I'm your host Stacey Simms. My son Benny was diagnosed with type one right before he turned to almost 15 years ago. My husband lives with type two diabetes. I don't have diabetes. I have a background in broadcasting. And that is how you get the podcast

In our most recent in the news episode. And that's the previous podcast episode two this one, I explained Lily's new move to drop the price of insulin lispro. Between that and Walmart's deal with Novo Nordisk, which lets Walmart price Novolog, same exact Insulet Novolog. a lot lower. We're seeing some interesting action on the cash price of insulin at the pharmacy. As I've said for years, though, I think it's going to take state and federal legislation to see real systemic change, you still need to jump through a lot of hoops, you still need to know that this is out there, you still need to find coupons in many cases, or you need to, you know, have really good insurance. There's a lot going on, and my guests this week are hoping that their documentary film will help educate people and make a difference. That film is currently in production. It is called Pay or Die. Here's a clip from the teaser,

Trailer here: https://payordiefilm.com/film-teaser

 

Stacey Simms  3:17

If that last bit sounds familiar, that's Nicole Holt Smith, who I've had on the show her son Alec died after rationing insulin, and that audio is from her arrest at a protest at Eli Lilly headquarters in 2019. Today, you're going to hear from the filmmaker Scott Ruderman and Rachael Dyer. Scott was diagnosed with type one in 2009. He is an award-winning filmmaker. He's worked on documentaries for Netflix and Hulu in the BBC and HBO, his documentary short piano craftman won Best Director at the Madrid art film festival.

He has a long list of credits, as does my other guest Rachael Dyer. She is an award winning journalist and producer who won a Southern California journalist Award for Best International feature, as well as a Clio entertainment grand winning entry for her work on the greatest showmen live the world's first live commercial for theatrical release

the story behind Pay or Die in just a moment but first Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dario Health bottom line you need a plan of action with diabetes. We've been really lucky that Benny’s endo has helped us with that and that he understands the plan has to change as Benny gets older you want that kind of support. So take your diabetes management to the next level with Dario health. They're published Studies demonstrate high impact results for active users like improved in range percentage within three months reduction of a one c within three months and a 58% decrease in occurrences of severe hypoglycemic events. Try Dario’s diabetes success plan and make a difference in your diabetes management. Go to my dario.com forward slash diabetes dash connections for more proven results and free information about the plan.

Scott and Rachael, thank you so much for joining me. I appreciate you spending some time with me and my listeners today.

 

Rachael Dyer  5:14

Thank you so much for having us. Stacey. We're really great, great time and looking forward to being here.

 

Stacey Simms  5:19

Let me start if I could with you, Scott, could you live with type one? Just briefly, could you tell us your diagnosis story, you were diagnosed as and as an adult? That's correct.

 

Scott Ruderman  5:29

I was in college, and it was around 2009. And it was my first semester in college I was I was going to Suffolk University in Boston, Massachusetts. And for about two weeks, I really wasn't feeling good. had all the symptoms, I say got very blurry, drinking a lot of fluids. I woke up one morning, and I just couldn't feel my legs from my waist down. It felt like they were being bags, I went to the school infirmary. And they they told me it sounds like type 1 diabetes are just diabetes. But they weren't. You know, they said it's probably not. But when they actually took a glucose reading, they left the room, the nurse came back in and she said, Look, I thought the meter was broken. But I checked my blood sugar and it's fine. Your blood sugar is not, it's not reading on the meter. So it's definitely going to be high, we want to send you an emergency room. So I went to Mass General, and I checked in and I was there for about a week. And then I resumed classes the week after it was it was a really hard week. But it was just one of those things. And I think a lot of type ones could relate that you just have to accept it. And the learning curve is it took a few years to really get on top of it. And then as the newer technology came in, it just got easier to manage.

 

Stacey Simms  6:42

So what led you all to this documentary? I assume it didn't happen as soon as you were diagnosed, Scott, but can you tell us a little bit about kind of what led you down this path, of course.

 

Rachael Dyer  6:53

So this has been a passion project for Scott for some time. And Scott and I actually met working together in the field. So obviously, we're both in the documentary business. And we just finished up working on a documentary together. And then I have a journalistic background. And I had done quite a few stories where I was looking at a lot of Americans traveling to Canada to get alternative medicine up there and their prescription medicine out there because it was a lot cheaper. I hadn't ever focused on insulin, but I had done other stories. So when Scott and I had met in the field and started speaking, Scott had told me that he was a type one diabetic, which I knew nothing about at the time, I knew very, very little about diabetes in general, let alone type one. And I was traveling to Canada because I'm Australian and half Canadian, and I was visiting my family. And I asked God to come with me. And I told him that I done some of these stories about, you know, Americans traveling up there. And Scott didn't believe me at first. And I thought that it was crazy what I was talking about. But we went, we went to Vancouver and we said, Look, I said why don't we just try. Let's see how we go. So he went to a few pharmacies and there and then the pharmacists were great. And we explained our situation, you know, Scott had shown brought in the insulin that he was on. And they, you know, were so generous and welcoming and kind and said to him, Look, what insulin Do you need right now for this trip? What can I help you with? And as Scott likes to explain it, he says it was like he was a kid in a candy shop, just to have that overwhelming experience with insulin that was so inaccessible, and so expensive in America to come forward and have it brought to him where he was paying at home in America up to $450 a vial out of pocket than to have the same same vial, same manufacturer, same everything brought to him for $21 in Canada, and to watch scotches break down and start crying there in the pharmacy. And for myself as well was I was left in shock and disbelief. And we just looked at each other as we walked out and said, It's time now to make this documentary. We have to do something about it. So that led us on our journey.

 

Scott Ruderman  9:19

I have to stay Stacy, to Rachel's point, it was a very emotional experience. It was one of those experiences where you feel joy but kind of frustration and at the same time I think I say this all the time. I really looked at my hands and for the first time I said Well, I'm feeling a little bit more accepted and cared for and thought out for then my experiences going to a pharmacy in the United States where I need more insulin and my prescription. You know, it's not it's not fully made out for the month yet and they're kind of like no, you have to come back next Tuesday and I can walk out of there and they know I could potentially die without my Insulet So it was just quite an experience. And to Rachel's point again, yes, we both said we're making a film about this.

 

Stacey Simms  10:07

So it seems to me that just from what you've said, it looks like it changed a bit though from Why can't we get more affordable insulin in the US? Why can't you like you can in so many other countries walk in and buy what you need to people are dying? And I'm curious, did you realize that as you started this project, or was that always part of the story all along?

 

Scott Ruderman  10:27

For me, when I was doing the initial research, you know, when I realized, the first thing I said, in my head, I wonder what people are doing that can't afford it, and where they're going, and upon my initial research, you know, obviously, people that can't afford to go on Facebook, you know, the clinical black market and media. But then I started reading all these stories about people rationing their insulin, and going into decay and dying just to make ends meet. And that's where things got a little bit more serious. And like, Whoa, this is not just being able to afford it, people are actually losing their life because they can't afford it. And that's kind of where the film kind of took it. It's kind of approach was that this is an issue and people are dying.

 

Stacey Simms  11:09

Rachel, what do you think the film is for? You know, it's very difficult, as you probably know, and as you live with type one, Scott, it's difficult to explain any of this to people who don't live with it day in and day out. I'm curious who you're producing this for, of course, and

 

Rachael Dyer  11:26

I think, you know, with anything, that is a huge challenge with trying to firstly explain an illness, which a lot of people do not live with. And also to, to differentiate between type one and type two, that is obviously a challenge in the beginning. But you know, there are huge differences. And there are huge differences, which we do point out in the film. Obviously, as you know, with your son living with type one as well, it is a life threatening illness, and you are insulin dependent. So you know, we explore that, but also to exploring the medical system in America, which, as anyone who lives here can understand that it is very complicated, which they love for it to be to make everyone think that this is something that we just have to live with. But for me, being an Australian and Canadian, I think, the shock factor from an international audience and not having to not only live with a debilitating illness, but also to then navigate this healthcare system is what we're trying to present throughout the film as well and show the microcosm of this healthcare system in the United States. So I would say that this film is being produced not only for the type one community or the diabetes community, but for not only also to a domestic and international audience to show what is going on in the states and how unjust it is, and how unfair it is for people just to not be able to access life saving medication and medication that in a lot of other countries around the world is affordable and accessible, and you shouldn't be dying because of it. So it's for everyone.

 

Stacey Simms  13:11

I'm curious, too. It's so hard to get this message to be clear, because our healthcare system is so complicated to the point where you can go on social media any day and see people within the diabetes community arguing about whether or not people can afford insulin. In other words, you know, if you start any kind of Twitter chain or Facebook conversation, you'll have everything from you know, mine's covered. 100%. I don't understand what your problem is to why don't we just get a coupon to the president lowered the price of insulin? No, the president raised the price of insulin. It's so confusing at Scott, did you focus on any of that conversation? Or is this more focusing on individual stories?

Right back to Scott answering that question, but first, Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Gvoke Hypopen and you know, low blood sugar feels horrible. You can get shaky and sweaty or even feel like you're going to pass out. There are a lot of symptoms that can be different for everybody. I am so glad we have a different option to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is the first auto injector to treat very low blood sugar Gvoke Hypopen is pre mixed and ready to go with no visible needle before gvoke. People needed to go through a lot of steps to get glucagon treatments ready to be used. This made emergency situations even more challenging and stressful. This is so much better. I'm grateful we have it on hand to find out more go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Gvoke logo. Gvoke shouldn't be used in patients with pheochromocytoma or insulinoma visit g vo glucagon.com slash risk.

Now back to Scott answering my question about whether the film looks at the bigger system or focuses on individual stories.

 

Scott Ruderman  14:56

That's a great question. This is a question that's brought up a lot as well. Let's just within our team, you know, this film is really, through, you know, the stories of people that are struggling. And we're capturing those human stories and seeing kind of the lengths, they are going to try to get access to the medication they need financially. And through their stories, we will kind of go into a little bit about the complex system, as well as politically what's happening. But the idea of the film is, this is a very character driven film. And we want people to be able to familiarize themselves with these characters and be able to, you know, say, well, that could be me, or that could be my friend's daughter who has type one or, you know, not even just type 1 diabetes. I mean, there's other medications that are so expensive, that anyone can kind of put themselves in those shoes and be like, what do I do if I can't afford medication. And that's really the shock factor we want to bring through in the film and urgency, because we can go on and on and on and talking about the complexities. But the problem is, it's never going to be solved, unless you're faced with the realities of it yourself. So bringing that to the viewer of making them feel like they are in the position of what our characters are going through is the goal to show the reality of the struggle

 

Rachael Dyer  16:16

to Scott's point that is very much the focus of the film, but we do have experts that we are speaking with that, breaking down the complexities behind it and showing how the system works. And with the experts that we have, they do actually show that the complicated system is being put there for a reason to make people feel like it is more complicated than what it actually is to make it so confusing that people just throw up their hands and say, I can't be bothered, this is just the way it is, which is certainly not the case. And it doesn't need to be the case. So you know, we do have the experts that have come in to break down that process and make it as simple as possible so people can understand this is not the way that it needs to be. Yeah,

 

Stacey Simms  17:03

that's great. Scott, what conclusion do you come from after this? I mean, I agree with Rachel, it's complicated, because it's designed that way. I do think the government will eventually get involved. We're seeing states now start making some changes. I'm not sure the federal government will ever take action. But you know, is it going to be a change in list price? Are we going to need to get rid of pbms? You know, did you draw any conclusions from this?

 

Scott Ruderman  17:28

You know, I think one of the the challenging things is the barriers of entry for just anyone trying to make a change with what's happening. And part of making this film is to kind of shine light on how complicated this system is. And no, this is this film gonna be the ultimate change? No, but it's trying to make the world a better place and down the road, do I think Insulet will be free? No. But I think just recently in the media over the last few years, this issue has been hot. And I think people are catching on and people are realizing that there needs to be more, you know, regulation on this. And prices need to be more affordable. I mean, think about when insulin, the discovery of insulin and Frederick Banting. I mean, the whole reason he sold it for $1 was so no one can make a profit of this. And I think looking at where we are today, I mean, discovery, insulin was a breakthrough discovery for the United States of America. And it's been celebrated. But if people can't afford it, and they're dying, because of it, that's going against the whole idea of making it affordable with bandings purpose to selling it. Hopefully, this is just a wake up call to say, hey, insulin was to to help people not to make profit off.

 

Stacey Simms  18:46

And I before Rachel jumps in, because I know she's half Canadian. Dr. Banting was Canadian, so we have to give the props. I know, I know, you meant you know, the manufacturer in the United States, and really purchasing getting all of that. But tell us a little bit if you could Scott about maybe some of the you said characters tell us a little bit about the people in this piece,

 

Scott Ruderman  19:05

of course. So you know, we have some principal characters, we've been following Nicole Holt Smith, who lost her son Alec, he was rushing his insulin, he couldn't afford, you know, the monthly cost. And he, he went into decay and died. And she's been fighting on the Minnesota State level to try to get access to emergency insulin in Minnesota. And we've been following her kind of battle on the state level. So that's one of our main stories. Another story. We've been following a mother and daughter who've been living out of their car because they need to make ends meet and you know, they're both type one, and they couldn't afford their insulin. So unfortunately, they were living in their car trying to survive, and they're the ones that crossed the border to find cheaper insulin in Canada. So we followed that story. And then we also have another story of a newly died This is during COVID. And the reason we brought that story in is we needed to, we want to cover all angles, we don't want all our characters to be this repetition of, I can't afford insulin, it's they're all struggling in different ways. And our COVID story of being diagnosed on COVID is, is to show the reality of what it's like and how your life just flips with type 1 diabetes, the management side, the physical side, and then again, the financial side. So it's all those aspects are in that story.

 

Rachael Dyer  20:29

Yeah. So just to Scott's point, I think that what we're trying to capture with all of our contributors and following their stories is it is just that it is a financial, emotional and physical burdens that, you know, everyone who is diagnosed with Type One Diabetes goes through on a daily basis. And I think that is the main emphasis that we really focus on throughout the film. And you see it through the stories, you see it through the emotional, physical and financial burden that they go through. And I think where Scott and I work well at both together, but our style as documentary filmmakers, is we are a very small footprint on the ground, a lot of the time, it is just Scott Nye traveling together. So we have a very personal relationship with the people that we film with, and they open up their world and they let us in and we become very familiar with who they are. And you see the heartbreak, you see the tears, you see the joy, and hopefully that is what is going to come across on film and and in the stories and if anyone has a daughter has a mother has a son has a child that is struggling in any capacity, whether it's with type one or something else, I feel as though that they're going to be able to relate. And that's the purpose behind these special stories that we're bringing to the screen.

 

Stacey Simms  21:58

Scott did anything surprise you, as you talk to these folks, when you live with type one yourself, I'm curious if anything that they said or anything they shared, took you by surprise,

 

Scott Ruderman  22:07

not only surprised, but as we kept going back into the fields, and filming, I think, you know, realizing that I am a type one and that this could happen to any day just kind of drop the reality perspective back to me. And I'm feeling what they're saying. Because, again, this I could be in this position. as a freelancer alone, covering my own health insurance, a bad month puts me in a bind. I'm actually the subject of my film in a way. So it's a very interesting connection. And it takes a toll on me. Every time I go and film, I need space after to just process what I'm hearing and what I'm going through, I think filming with Nicole Smith hope of being a mother of, you know, losing her son, I think my mom like what my mom would go through. If I were to pass away because of this and following Nicole. And you know, that's where you kind of see a real mother's purpose of just she's not going to stop being Alex's mother. By doing that she's going to continue to try to make an example that this is not okay, and be a voice for all the mothers out there that do have children diagnosed with type one and could be struggling because when you turn 26 years old, and you're off your parents health insurance as a type one, it's a new learning curve. It's a financial learning curve. And it could be very difficult. It could mean the job you get where you apply. It's not what you want to do in life. It's what can I do, that's going to keep me alive so I can afford, you know, for my insulin to keep me alive. It's a very scary and Nicole always says it's that number 26. And I'm only 31 years old, and I was 26. I remember that moment. It's really hard.

 

Stacey Simms  23:58

Before I let you go, unless each of you this question, why do you work in documentary? This is a it's such a different type of filmmaking. It's so personal. As you said, Scott, you kind of have to recover if every time you talk to somebody, why do you do it?

 

Rachael Dyer  24:12

I'll jump in. I think for me, as I mentioned earlier, my experience and background was as a journalist for over 10 years and you know, I dealt with some really challenging and and hard hitting stories. For the my first four years in America, I was traveling the country and working in breaking news. And for me, with the 24 hour news cycle that has just become so relentless, my personality is one of which I just had to stop being on the ground for less than 24 hours and seeing these people let's hop right and wanting to share their story more and so naturally, I just transitioned over to wanting to be in the documentary space to spend money. more time with individuals learn about who they are and share these really important stories on the world stage. Rather than just jumping in and out for a one and a half minute nice cars. Yeah, for me, it was just important to be there with the people, and spend the time sharing these really relevant stories.

 

Scott Ruderman  25:19

For me. I love storytelling, I think one of the greatest things about documentary is to every project, you're in a different world, you are discovering the lives of people and what they're going through, and to be able to film that and see transformation and see someone change along the way along the process is extraordinary. For me, it's also extremely challenging. And being in a room with a camera and filming people at on the moment. It's in this sense, you know, I like to say in fiction film, you know, the director is God. But when it comes to documentary and nonfiction, God is the director, and you don't know what's going to happen in front of your lens, and to be there and capture a moment that could only happen once and walk away with that and be part of that is what keeps me coming back to make more documentaries.

 

Stacey Simms  26:11

And in general, and maybe just for this one, too. I'm always curious, how much more do you film than you use? Right? I mean, it's got to be hours and hours and hours that you're filming that you're not going to use?

 

Rachael Dyer  26:24

Yeah, I think that's always the fun part. The fun part for us, but definitely not the fun part for the editor when they have hours, and hours and hours of footage to go through. But yeah, like Scott said, I think that the difference between documentary and true documentary is that you do not know a lot of the time what is going to happen, you can only prepare so much. But there is a lot that is unpredictable and doesn't happen and you you know, you want to film that you want to see the change and evolutions in these people. So again, I think it depends on the documentary, the subject matter, but and also to where you initially thought the film might go might not be how it ends up in the Edit. So we're not at that stage yet. So I think we will see but you know, there is a lot that we have filmed but a lot of special moments to within that.

 

Scott Ruderman  27:22

Yeah, another challenging thing about making a documentary. And you know, I just also want to point out there this documentary, until we started actually securing funds was funded out of pocket by me. And one of the hardest things is, you know, we have characters across the nation, West Coast, mid coast, and one of the hardest things is always being there at the right moment. And you know, being able to jump on a plane with all the gear get there and be there in time to capture it. That's a huge cost factor. And you know, that's a decision you have to make. That's one of the challenges about document and you're not with people, you know, we've been filming this for a few years now we're not with our characters fully on for years. It's it's coming back and going. And there are moments where it's exhausting for subjects because we're there and we have to take a break. And then we come back and you know, new development occurs. And that's the beauty of it is following and following and following it seeing that transformation.

 

Stacey Simms  28:17

Well, Scott and Rachael, we really look forward to the completion of this and seeing it and spreading the word. Thank you so much for joining me and sharing your story and we look forward to the release of the movie. Thanks. Thank you watch.

You're listening to Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms. More information at Diabetes connections.com. I will link up the website to Pay or Die and any other information about the timing production, that sort of thing. Of course, there's a transcription along with this episode as there is with every episode since the beginning of 2020.

Just a real quick note about our experience with insulin and coupons. And I've shared this story before and it's been about a year now I realize that we decided we had changed insurance right around this time last year, and they wanted to change us from human log to novolog. But he's been doing great. I did not want to make any changes. I mean, you know how it is when things are going well. So we decided we had a little bit of a stockpile, Lino, let's fight it. And it took me a full two weeks of spending a lot of time calling the pharmacy calling my doctor we got some coupons I went to get insulin.org and went through that process and you know, immediately printed out a coupon for human log and said this will be $35 a month. It was not that easy. I took it to the pharmacy and they said nope, it doesn't scan so we had to jump through a lot of hoops. What happened for us was we got a new prior authorization from Benny's endocrinologist and the pharmacy ranted as a new prescription. So that helped us and you know what, I'm afraid knock on wood is word As I'm looking around here, we have not had to do anything else it renewed automatically for 2021. And so far so good. I'll keep you posted. if anything changes, it was a lot of hoops to jump through. I'm grateful I had the time and the knowledge to do so I know not everybody can spend that much time and has that good of a relationship with both their pharmacist and their endo. What a mess.

Alright, more to come. But first I want to tell you about another one of our sponsors Diabetes Connections is brought to you by Dexcom. You I want to talk about control IQ. This is the Dexcom G6 Tandem pump software program. And when it comes to Benny, even though I hardly expect perfection, I really do I just want him happy and healthy. I have to say control IQ the software from Dexcom. And Tandem has exceeded my expectations, Benny is able to do less checking and bolusing. And spending more time in range is a once these are the lowest they have ever been. This isn't a teenager at the time when I was really prepared for him to be struggling. And everybody’s sleep is better to with basal adjustments possible every five minutes, the system is working hard to keep him in range. And that means we hear far fewer Dexcom alerts, rural sleeping better. I'm so grateful for this, of course individual results may vary. To learn more, just go to Diabetes connections.com and click on the Dexcom logo.

If you're listening to this episode as a first airs, it's the first episode of October of 2021. It's also the beginning of a stretch of really, really busy weeks for me, I am hoping to have an episode every week this month. But please follow me on social it is possible, especially two weeks from now, that's kind of iffy, but I'll see what I can do. I am traveling to New York this coming weekend, I was supposed to go to friends for life White Plains, that is now a virtual event that's going to happen in November. But I'm still going because I have family up there. And I have some plans. So I'm really excited. And then the phone week I'm going to shoot podcasts live, which is a female podcasting event that I've been working on. I'm working with them to help with that event. So I'm really excited about that. And then later in the month, my husband and I are going to go away to celebrate a big birthday of mine. And in between I'm trying to make room for lots of just fun local stuff where I am because yeah, I mean, I don't usually celebrate my birthday all month long. But hey, I'm turning 50 I gotta tell you, I mean, are you Is anybody excited about turning 50? I'm not thrilled right about getting older. But man, I'm thrilled about getting older. I really have mixed feelings about this, because it is a milestone. So I'll be sharing more maybe on social media, we'll see.

But I do have a couple of fun announcements coming up. They will be mostly in the Facebook group, or at least they'll be first in the Facebook group. So if you're not in Diabetes Connections, the group please make sure to jump in there. end of October, maybe mid to late October. I've got a couple of announcements. I need your help with some upcoming projects. It's going to be a lot of fun. All right, thank you as always to my editor John Bukenas from audio editing solutions. Thank you so much for listening. I will be back with in the news that's gonna happen every Wednesday at 430. Even as I'm on the road, I've done it before. I don't mind doing it again, from my friend's homes, my sister's house or from hotel rooms. I like doing those in the news episodes live. So those will continue. I'll see you back here in just a couple of days. Until then, be kind to yourself.

Benny  33:12

Diabetes Connections is a production of Stacey Simms Media. All rights reserved. All wrongs avenged

Oct 1, 2021

In the News.. this week: Lilly drops the price of some insulins, this T1D group most likely to be hospitalized if infected with COVID, insulin pumps reduce risk of retinopathy, Novo Nordisk pays investors to settle earnings claims, another through-the-skin glucose monitor and more!

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Episode transcription below 

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.  As always, I’m going to link up my sources in the Facebook comments – where we are live – and in the show notes at d-c dot com when this airs as a podcast.. so you can read more if you want, on your own schedule.

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In the News is brought to you by Real Good Foods! Find their Entrée Bowls and all of their great products in your local grocery store, Target or Costco.

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Our top story – Lilly announces a big price change on some insulins. Starting this January, the cash price of Insulin Lispro goes down 40%. Lispro is identical to Humalog – the price on that one isn’t changing. Lilly says one in three prescriptions for their mealtime insulin is for Insulin Lispro.

I asked Lilly why now and what about Humalog? I’ll put my Q&A in the show notes – you’ll be able to read them at diabetes dash connections dot com and in the Facebook group.. their answers were vague – although one interesting point.. they claim these programs have lowered the monthly out of pocket cost of a prescription for Lilly insulin to 28 dollars.. a decrease of 27% over the past four years.

The bottom line here is that you still have to do the work… your pharmacist can substitute lispro for humalog – or the other way around – however the prescription is written.. make sure you ask them to check which is cheaper either with your insurance, with a coupon or with the cash price. It’s a lot of work, but with all of these options, you want to figure out what’s best for you.

https://beyondtype1.org/lower-list-price-lilly-insulin-lispro/

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Adults over 40 with type 1 are 4 times more likely to be hospitalized with COVID 19 than younger people. New study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. This study looked at thousands of people with type 1 from April 2020 to March of 2021 – so it’s worth noting that the recent Delta wave isn’t included here. Hospitalized here means inpatient or ICU not emergency room. This is where it gets really interesting – they adjusted for sex, A1C, race and ethnicity, insurance type and comorbidities – it was being over 40 that still increased the odds. That’s not to say A1C didn’t matter.. The likelihood for hospitalization was higher for all ages with a higher A1C.  Also interesting.. there was no significant difference for adverse outcomes between the age groups. They grouped together DKA, severe hypoglycemia and death as the adverse outcomes here..

https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20210928/older-adults-with-type-1-diabetes-more-likely-to-be-hospitalized-for-covid19-than-youths

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Using an insulin pump may decrease the risk of diabetic retinopathy in younger people with type 1. These researchers looked at almost 2000 patients under the age of 21 and found - after adjusting for race and ethnicity, insurance status, diabetes duration, and A1C - patients with pumps had a 57% decreased risk for retinopathy. The thinking here is that it’s about less variability in blood glucose. However, there were disparities in access to pumps, with pump users more likely to be white and have private or commercial insurance.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/959758

 

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Very early on but potentially big news out of China… this is the DREAM study a phase three clinical trial of a medication called dorzagliatin (DOOR-zuh-GLY-uh-tin)– this is for people with type 2. While it was a small study it has big results.. after a year, 65% of the 69 patients were in remission – that generally means A1Cs under 6.5 with no glucose lowering medication – although the exact definition of remission was not given here. These findings were presented at a recent BioMed Conference in China.

https://www.biospace.com/article/hua-medicine-may-be-sending-type-2-diabetes-into-remission-/

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Novo Nordisk shareholders say pants on fire to the insulin maker and get a $100 million dollar settlement. What happened here? Novo allegedly told investors not to worry about insulin pricing pressures from lawmakers and patient groups  - that they’d still make plenty of money. But the investors disagreed – saying other insulin makers were warning their investors that profits could fall.

This lawsuit has nothing to do with any benefit to patients – it was all about investors who were actually asking for 1.7 billion dollars. Novo agreed to the smaller deal saying they just wanted to avoid the burden of litigation, no admission of wrong doing.

https://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/novo-nordisk-agrees-to-100m-settlement-investors-who-claimed-company-misled-them-about-its

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This is from last week but want to make sure you’ve seen a voluntary glucagon recall. Lilly is recalling a specific lot from their red box emergency kit. It’s lot D239382D so please check. The problem here is that someone reported the vial of glucagon was in liquid form instead of powder – which can mean the glucagon isn’t going to work well in an emergency. If you got this lot – bring it back to the pharmacy or call Lilly. Info in the link and show notes.

https://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls-market-withdrawals-safety-alerts/eli-lilly-and-company-issues-voluntary-nationwide-recall-one-lot-glucagonr-emergency-kit-due-loss

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You might have seen the headline on this one: if you can’t fit into the jeans you wore at age 21 you’re at risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

I dug a little deeper on this.. very small study. First. These people weren’t even overweight. They did have type 2 and as part of the study managed to lose fat and the researchers said their diabetes was put into remission. They all followed a weight loss program of a low calorie liquid diet for two weeks – 800 calories a day! They did this three times  until they lost 10 to 15 percent of their body fat.

The researchers say this “demonstrate very clearly that diabetes is not caused by obesity but by being too heavy for your own body”. What does that mean?!

What does it have to do with the headline about jeans at age 21? And what happens to these poor people who were slurping 800 calories a day and are now just back to their normal lives?

I’m hoping I missed something big on this one..

 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/sep/27/people-who-cant-fit-into-jeans-they-wore-aged-21-risk-developing-diabetes

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More to come, But first, I want to tell you about one of our great sponsors who helps make Diabetes Connections possible.

Real Good Foods. Where the mission is Be Real Good

They make nutritious foods— grain free, high in protein, never added sugar and from real ingredients—the new Entrée bowls are great. They have a chicken burrito, a cauliflower mash and braised beef bowl.. the lemon chicken I’ve told you about and more! They keep adding to the menu line! You can buy online or find a store near you with their locator right on the website. I’ll put a link in the FB comments and as always at d-c dot com.

Back to the news…

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We’ve got another through the skin glucose monitor in the news. Know Labs debuted it’s Know-U device which is very small, fits in your pocket and is powered by what they call Bio R-Fid technology. It emits radio waves to measure specific molecular signatures in the blood through the skin. They’ve also got UBand.. which is a bracelet that does the same thing.

Do they work? According to a 2018 study 97% of the UBand’s readings were within 15% of the values calculated by the Abbot Libre. But that wasn’t a clinical trial – those are starting this year.

 

https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/know-labs-unveils-pocket-sized-glucose-monitor-swaps-fingersticks-for-radiofrequency

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And finally, maybe the most glamorous photo featuring an insulin pump.. model Lila Moss – daughter of supermodel Kate Moss – walked the Fendi Versace runway at Milan’s fashion week with her Omnipod very visible. Lila Moss has type 1 and while they family has never really mentioned it, she’s been photographed with her pod on before. Lots of write ups about this – great to see the representation

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Please join me wherever you get podcasts for our next episode - The episode out right now is with Marjorie’s Fund – helping people survive diabetes in countries with few resources.. and next week we’re featuring the folks behind the upcoming Pay or Die film about insulin access..

That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

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