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Diabetes Connections with Stacey Simms Type 1 Diabetes

The T1D news show you've been waiting for! Long-time broadcaster, blogger and diabetes mom Stacey Simms interviews prominent advocates, authors and speakers. Stacey asks hard questions of healthcare companies and tech developers and brings on "everyday' people living with type 1. Great for parents of T1D kids, adults with type 1 and anyone who loves a person with diabetes.
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Now displaying: 2022
Sep 27, 2022

Dexcom's G7 is still not approved in the United States, but it's in limited release in Europe. This week, friend of the show Kamil Armacki, better known as Nerdabetic, interviews Dexcom's Chief Operating Officer, Jake Leach.

Find more about Kamil over at his amazing YouTube Channel here: https://www.youtube.com/c/nerdabetic

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

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Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

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*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

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Sep 23, 2022

It’s In the News! This week’s top diabetes headlines and stories include: cybersecurity risk cited for some Medtronic pumps, Omnipod 5 gets European approval, new data about the Freestyle Libre and avoiding hospitalizations, the new T1D Index and more!

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
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potential cybersecurity risk for Medtronic MiniMed 600 Series Insulin Pump Systems. The FDA sent out an alert for multiple systems including the MiniMed 630 G and MiniMed 670G. They say this is a potential issue and that there have NOT been any reports of actually unauthorized access. Medtronic has issued an Urgent Medical Device Correction on their own website notifying users as well as providing recommended actions.
If unauthorized access occurs, the pump’s communication protocol could be compromised, which may cause the pump to deliver too much or too little insulin,” noted the FDA’s September 20 Cybersecurity alert.

On their website, Medtronic provides the Urgent Medical Device Correction, a list of model numbers impacted by the issue, and a multitude of frequently asked questions for device users. Within these resources, Medtronic notes the issue was identified through an internal review and, while the event meets the definition of a recall, users are not required to return their devices.

In a letter to users, which was signed by Chirag Tilara, vice president of Quality at Medtronic Diabetes, and Robert Vigersky, MD, chief medical officer at Medtronic Diabetes, the pair recommended all patients turn off the “Remote Bolus” feature on their pump if it is turned on, which is on by default. The letter also urged users to conduct any connection linking of devices in a nonpublic setting. Additional recommended precautions from Medtronic included keeping pump and connected system components within user control at all times, be attentive to pump notifications, alarms, and alerts, and immediately cancel any boluses you or your care partner did not initiate.

The FDA urged those with questions to reach out to Medtronic at 1-800-646-4633, option 1.
https://www.endocrinologynetwork.com/view/cybersecurity-risk-minimed-600-systems-alert-from-fda-medtronic
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Omnipod 5 gets the CE Mark, that’s European approval for individuals aged two years and older with type 1 diabetes. This comes as Insulet presents new studies at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) meeting in Stockholm, Sweden.
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220920005138/en/Insulet-Announces-CE-Mark-Approval-for-Omnipod%C2%AE-5-Automated-Insulin-Delivery-System

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Abbott says the Freestyle Libre system can help reduce diabetes-related hospitalizations. Data from the Real-World Evidence of Freestyle Libre (RELIEF) were presented this week. The retrospective study of the French national health claims database shows that the 5,933 people with Type 2 diabetes who were following a basal-only regimen and using the FreeStyle Libre system had 67% fewer ADE-related hospitalizations one year after initiating the FreeStyle Libre treatment.
The data also show a 75% reduction in hospitalizations for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a potentially life-threatening condition when glucose levels are too high for too long and ketone levels rise to dangerous levels in the blood, and a 44% reduction in admissions for severe hypoglycemia (low glucose levels).

Further, the study showed sustained reductions in hospitalizations over a two-year period of FreeStyle Libre system use, regardless of whether the patients were under the care of a diabetes specialist or a general healthcare practitioner.
https://www.mddionline.com/diabetes/can-abbotts-freestyle-libre-help-reduce-diabetes-related-hospitalizations
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A look at bone health and type 1 diabetes in teen girls. Small study herewith girls age 10-16.. found that the more sedentary had worse markers of bone health in imaging tests than girls without diabetes. When the groups had the same physical activity, no difference was seen regardless of diabetes. However, this is early research and further study is needed, the group cautions.

However, if further, rigorous studies confirm these findings, "physical activity is potentially a really effective means of improving bone quality in kids with type 1 diabetes."
https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/981092
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Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
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DRF, a global type 1 diabetes (T1D) research and advocacy organization, announces the launch of the Type 1 Diabetes Index (T1D Index). The T1D Index is a first-of-its-kind data simulation tool that measures the human and public health impact of the T1D crisis in every country across the globe. Until now, there have been wide gaps in the data about the incidence and impact of T1D. Leveraging data and insights from the T1D Index can help change the lives of people living with T1D by identifying attainable country-by-country interventions including timely diagnosis, accessible care and funding research that could lead to cures.
The T1D Index and accompanying research has been published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

T1D is an autoimmune condition and one of the fastest-growing chronic health conditions, impacting nearly nine million people across the globe. Certain factors like family history can increase risk, but it is not caused by diet or lifestyle. T1D causes the pancreas to make very little insulin or none at all—this means the human body cannot convert food into energy, which can lead to long-term complications including damage to the kidneys, eyes, nerves, heart and even premature death. There is currently no cure for T1D.

"As a member of the T1D community, I know many are not as fortunate as I am to have the resources necessary to live a healthy and fulfilled life," Aaron Kowalski, Ph.D., JDRF CEO, said. "This is why I am so proud that significant progress has been made to understand T1D's global impact through the T1D Index. We are calling on government and public health decision makers throughout the world to utilize the tool to identify and implement interventions that can change the trajectory of T1D."

JDRF collaborated with key partners and experts around the world to develop the T1D Index—using the results from a global survey of more than 500 endocrinologists and 400 publications to simulate the state of T1D globally and at the country level.

The Index uniquely illuminates the human burden of T1D by highlighting "missing people," which is the number of people who would still be alive today if they had not died early due to complications from T1D, and "healthy years lost," which represents time lost to ill-health, disability or early death from living with T1D.

Simulations from the T1D Index suggest that globally, as of 2022, there are more than 3.86 million "missing people" and an average of 32 "healthy years lost" to T1D per person, if diagnosed at age 10.

T1D presents a profound human, emotional and financial burden for those who live with it—and prevalence is on the rise. Simulations from the T1D Index have led to the identification of four key interventions that could change the current trajectory for T1D and its impact on people around the world:

Timely diagnosis: enabling better education and training for medical professionals to accurately diagnose T1D. If the global population has access to timely diagnosis from 2023, 668,000 more people could be alive in 2040.
Insulin and strips: creating barrier-free access to insulin and blood glucose testing strips. If the global population has access to insulin and testing strips from 2023, and coaching to self-manage the condition, 1.98 million more people could be alive in 2040.
Pumps and CGMs: ensuring everyone living with T1D has access to technology that automates glucose monitoring and insulin delivery. 673,000 more people could be alive in 2040 if everyone with T1D has access to the technology available from 2023.
Prevention and cures: making the case for further investment and research in emerging prevention, treatments and cures. 890,000 more people could be alive in 2040 if we find cures.
Once interventions are identified on the global and country level, the T1D Index encourages users to take action by sharing the data and findings with their networks and local decision makers, and connecting with other T1D advocates in their communities.

Additionally, the T1D Index shines a light on important statistics about the burden of T1D globally, including:

Since 2000, T1D prevalence has increased at four times the rate of global population growth.
The expected number of people living with T1D in 2040 will be 17.43 million.
The number of "missing people" in the year 2040 is projected to be 6.85 million.
https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-09-global-diabetes-index.htmlXX
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Sep 20, 2022

Researchers at UVA recently published a study called Design and Validation of an Open-Source Closed-Loop Testbed for Artificial Pancreas Systems. They say what they’ve set up here is quote - a valid tool that can be used by the research community to demonstrate the effectiveness of different control algorithms and safety features for APS, automated pancreas systems.

This week, you'll hear from Xugui Zho and Homa Alemzadeh, two of the researchers on this study.

Link to the study:

https://arxiv.org/pdf/2208.06479.pdf

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Sep 16, 2022

It's In the News! This week's top diabetes headlines and stories include: with more cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in US kids, researchers look into whether more screenings should take place. There's a new injectable on the market that some studies show can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes in overweight and obese people, Medtronic faces a shareholder lawsuit and a 92-yar old Long Island woman, diagnosed as a child, may be one of the oldest living people with type 1. She has some great things to say about what helps her manage well all this time!

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Sep 13, 2022

Doug Scalia has completed 25 marathons in 15 states. He’s about to add three more to his list, including the New York City Marathon as part of a team of people with type 1. He knows it sounds like an impossible feat for many, but he says anyone can do it! Doug was diagnosed as a young adult and he’s also played in the World Series of Poker so we have a lot to talk about.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

Learn more about Beyond Type Run and Doug's team

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Sep 9, 2022

It’s in the news! The top stories and headlines around the diabetes community this week include: A new way to sneak islet cells into the body without needing immunosuppressive drugs, routinely checking young children for T1D markets before symptoms show up, a non invasive way to measure blood glucose uses Radio Frequency, a DIY movement publishes in the New England Journal of Medicine and more!

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
XX
French biopharma company Adocia has established a first proof of concept for its AdoShell Islets implant. This was in rats.. but they achieved glycemic control without insulin injections and without immunosuppressive drugs for four months.
AdoShell Islets is an immuno-protective synthetic biomaterial that secrets insulin in response to blood glucose levels. The physical barrier formed by the AdoShell biomaterial allows the implanted cells to be invisible to the host’s immune system while allowing the necessary physiological exchanges to occur for the survival and function of the islets.
These researchers are optimistic that their unique approach can be translated from one species to another.
https://www.labiotech.eu/trends-news/adocia-implants-diabetes/
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Can starting a closed loop system right away help keep kids with type 1 in the honeymoon stage longer? New study says.. probably not.
The latest findings are from the Closed Loop From Onset in Type 1 Diabetes (CLOuD) trial, a multicenter, open-label, parallel-group, randomized study, published online September 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine by Charlotte K. Boughton, PhD, and colleagues.
In CLOuD, 97 youths aged 10-17 years were randomized to hybrid closed-loop therapy or standard insulin therapy (control) within 21 days of type 1 diabetes diagnosis. I found this a bit confusing, in the standard insulin therapy groups, participants could switch to insulin pump therapy or use flash or continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) or approved closed-loop systems if clinically indicated. So this isn’t comparing an AID system to MDI.
At 12 months, there were no differences after a mixed-meal tolerance test, with levels declining in both groups and dropping further by 24 months. Interestingly, they said glycemic control didn’t differ significantly between the two groups.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/980356
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Moving closer to a non-invasive way to measure blood glucose. The GlucoRx BioXensor uses radio frequency technology alongside a multiple sensor approach to measure blood glucose levels every minute. This looks to be about the size of a Libre 3 or Dexcom G7..
It’s said to have smart alarms and remote monitoring capability and just sticks on the skin. The MARD is 10 point 4, which is less accurate than CGMs on the market now, but much better than any other noninvasive device to make it this far. In addition to measuring blood glucose the makers say it can measure oxygen levels, ECG, respiration rate, heart rate, temperature, activity, sleep, and early fall detection.
Pivotal clinical study later this year and then the say they’ll submit for European approval.
https://www.med-technews.com/news/latest-medtech-news/glucorx-and-cardiff-university-to-bring-out-non-invasive-con/
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RESEARCHERS in Oxford have launched the first UK study in the general population to test for early markers of type 1 diabetes, before children develop symptoms or need insulin. They’re offering a finger stick test when children have their pre-school vaccination. Very small start, only 60 kids, but these researchers say with a recent, more accurate test to check for markers early on, they hope to find more children before DKA sets in.
https://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/news/20977659.oxford-scientists-launch-study-early-markers-type-1-diabetes-children/
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The first Randomized Controlled Trial on open source automated insulin delivery (AID) is now published in a peer-reviewed medical journal. Big news for and from the we are not waiting crowd.
The CREATE Trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of an open-source system using the OpenAPS algorithm in a modified version of AndroidAPS. This study included children and adults and found that across all ages, time in range was 14 percent higher than those who used commercial hybrid closed loop systems. There’s more to it, and I”ll link it up, but this study concluded that a widely used open-source AID solution, works and is safe. Congrats to Dana Lewis and all the researchers involved.
https://diyps.org/2022/09/07/nejm-publishes-rct-on-open-source-automated-insulin-delivery-openaps-algorithm-in-androidaps-in-the-create-trial/
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Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
XX

Medtronic is waiting for FDA clearing of the new 780G.. already approved in Europe. New study results published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Medtronic announced Thursday put the AID pump up against multiple daily injections plus CGM. Small study, 82 people, all with an A1C over 8. After using the 780G for six months, the group saw a reduction of 1.4 percent in their levels with a quarter of that group dropping their A1C below 7. None of the MDI group dropped to that level. Time in range saw most improvement overnight.
The MiniMed 780G system has been cleared in Europe since 2020. Medtronic submitted it to the FDA for U.S. approval in the spring of 2021 but is still awaiting a decision, slowed down by the roadblocks caused by a late 2021 warning letter from the agency that called out quality control issues at the California headquarters of its diabetes business.
https://www.fiercebiotech.com/medtech/medtronics-new-minimed-insulin-pump-adds-27-boost-time-range-study-finds
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Change at one of the top posts at Dexcom. Jake Leach moves from Chief Technology Officer to Chief operating officer. He’s been at the company since 2004 to work on the first commercial Dexcom CGM system. He’s been a frequent guest of the show and we hope that continues.
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220831005236/en/DexCom-Promotes-Jake-Leach-to-Chief-Operating-Officer
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Next week we’re looking ahead to the New York City Marthong. Beyond Type 1 puts together a gret team each year and I’m taking to one of the runners. He’s also nabbed a spot in the world series of poker – which do you think is tougher on his type 1 diabetes? This past episode is all about Omnipod 5 – a panel of people who’ve sued it for a few weeks now.. and the director of medical affairs to answer your questions.
Listen wherever you get your podcasts
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Sep 6, 2022

Omnipod 5 was approved earlier this year and just rolled out to a wider release. So how is the first tubeless automated insulin delivery system doing in the real world? We put together a panel of early adopters and got their feedback. That was great, but it brought up quite a few questions, so we reached out to Omnipod for clarification and follow up. The result is a super-sized episode full of info!

Our panel: Liat Kochavi, mother an almost-8-year-old with T1D, Stephanie Williams, mother of a teen with type 1, and Sam Durante who was diagnosed with type 1 just before she turned 16. You'll also here from Insulet's Director of Medical Affairs Alex Nyugen, RD, CDCES.

FYI, we were fortunate to speak with Insulet earlier this year, just after the FDA approval, and really went point by point through Omnipod 5. So we’re not rehashing everything here. If you missed that episode, here's the link: Omnipod 5 interview from Feb 2022

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

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Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
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Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Sep 2, 2022

It’s in the news! The top stories and headlines around the diabetes community this week include new progress in the quest for oral insulin to treat type 1, a new study says a common type 2 diabetes drug may help those with serious heart condition, a look at teen brains and T1D, NSAID and type 2 and more!

Learn about the T1d Exchange: www.t1dexchange.org/stacey 

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

-----

Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
-----

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
XX
In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
XX
Our top story.. very early on here, but some progress in oral insulin for type 1. A team at University of British Columbia has developed a different kind of tablet that isn't made for swallowing, but instead dissolves when placed between the gum and cheek. This method delivered all the insulin to the liver without wasting or decomposing any insulin along the way. That’s a big change from earlier studies and methods. The oral tablets absorb after about half an hour and last for up to four hours.. long way to go, no human trials yet. The the lead researcher on this project has a father with type 1 .
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2022/08/220830093215.htm?fbclid=IwAR1AzjI5UJma9I6g4hST044FS0MbJnUA0EXCmKXyhcOiOKL-ckIQTO4h8dY
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The type 2 diabetes drug dapagliflozin might also be used to help people with heart failure. A new study at Brigham and Women's Hospital showed that dapagliflozin – sold under the brand name Farxiga - reduced the risk of a cardiovascular death, or worsening heart failure, regardless of ejection fraction. Ejection fraction is a term that basically refers to how much blood is pumped out by the left ventricle of the heart each time it contracts. That’s important because this drug has already been shown to help people who have the reduced pumping. And that’s a lot more people. Big study here, more than 12-thousand people with lots of ages and races, benefits consistent throughout.
https://www.bostonglobe.com/2022/08/29/business/brigham-womens-researchers-say-diabetes-drug-helps-reduce-heart-failure/
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I hesitate to bring this study up, but it’s gotten a lot of attention this week. It shows tight control of blood sugar in teens with Type 1 diabetes may help reduce the disease’s damaging effects on the brain. But this small study from Nemours Children’s Health, Jacksonville and Stanford University School of Medicine didn’t release any numbers, n other words, it’s not clear what they mean by tight control or at what level they’re referring to for brain issues. Their findings to indicate that automated hybrid closed loop systems work really well and that better glucose control can actually improve brain structure and function in teens with type 1. I’ve reached out to this group and we’re working on getting more information in a future episode.
https://neurosciencenews.com/blood-sugar-brain-diabetes-21328/
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Very early on here.. but an Indiana startup says they have a potentially game changing type 1 drug in development. In T1D, the body’s immune system causes destruction of beta cells, and as a result, they eventually stop producing insulin. These researchers say their models show thy can take what were thought to be dead beta cells, which are actually sleeping beta cells, and increase their insulin secretion and, basically, get them back to a functional state.” They’re focusing on a calcium imbalance within the beta cell and designing molecules to correct that calcium imbalance, ultimately returning the pancreas to a healthy state. JDRF has given them a big grant for a two year project, hopefully getting them to clinical trials.
https://www.insideindianabusiness.com/articles/startup-awarded-nearly-1m-to-advance-diabetes-drug
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People with type 2 diabetes might face a substantially increased risk of heart failure if they take ibuprofen or some other type of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), accord to a new Danish study.
Short-term NSAID use increased risk of hospitalization for heart failure by 43% in people with type 2 but no previous heart problems. This was a large but preliminary study presented at the European Society of Cardiology's annual meeting. NSAIDs increased the risk of heart failure even more in type 2 diabetics who were 80 or older (78%) or who had high blood sugar levels (68%), the results showed. Those who'd never used an NSAID before had the worst reaction, with their heart failure risk nearly tripling. Type 2 diabetics should consult with their doctor before taking any pain medicine, the doctors said. Other types of pain meds -- specifically acetaminophen (Tylenol) -- should be safe for them to use.
https://www.usnews.com/news/health-news/articles/2022-08-24/certain-painkillers-raise-heart-failure-risk-in-people-with-type-2-diabetes

XX
Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
XX
We told you about The Human Trial, Watch this gripping new documentary about the brave men and women who volunteer to test a radical new treatment for type 1 diabetes. n 2011, Lisa Hepner and her husband Guy Mossman heard about a radical stem cell treatment for diabetes, a disease that shockingly kills more than five million people each year. Driven by a desire to cure Lisa of her own type 1 diabetes (T1D), the filmmakers were given unprecedented, real-time access to a clinical trial — only the sixth-ever embryonic stem cell trial in the world. What follows is an intimate journey with the patients and scientists who put themselves on the line to be first.
Now, in partnership with Beyond Type 1 & JDRF , they’re offering the film for free. You are urged to make a donation to JDRF when you click over, there is an option to select zero,
https://watch.showandtell.film/watch/the-human-trial-beyond-type-1
XX
Next week we’ve got a great episode all about Omnipod 5 in the real world. I spoke to a panel of moms and a young adult using the system. And we’ve got Insulet’s Director of Medical affairs addressing the questions that come up. This past episode is with my son Benny, talking about what it was like to spend 8 weeks away at non diabetes camp without any remote monitoring from us.
Listen wherever you get your podcasts
That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

Aug 30, 2022

Stacey's son spent the summer away at regular, non-diabetes sleepaway camp. 8 weeks managing all of his own care, with no remote monitoring. You had a lot of questions, including how he manages overnight lows:

Benny is 17, he was diagnosed just before he turned two and, as usual, he has a lot to say. He had quite a few adventures at camp, but everything turned out okay. We get his take on independence, responsibility and a glimpse into how a teen with type 1 thinks.

This podcast is not intended as medical advice. If you have those kinds of questions, please contact your health care provider.

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Aug 26, 2022

It’s in the news! The top stories and headlines around the diabetes community this week include a new attempt to have fewer misdiagnoses of type 2 (when it's really type 1) diabetes, a new approval for Omnipod 5 down to two years old, a look at the endocrinologist shortage in the US, a milestone for Tandem and more!

Check out Stacey's book: The World's Worst Diabetes Mom!

Join the Diabetes Connections Facebook Group!

Sign up for our newsletter here

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Use this link to get one free download and one free month of Audible, available to Diabetes Connections listeners!
-----

Episode Transcription Below (or coming soon!)

Please visit our Sponsors & Partners - they help make the show possible!

*Click here to learn more about OMNIPOD*

*Click here to learn more about AFREZZA*

*Click here to learn more about DEXCOM*

Hello and welcome to Diabetes Connections In the News! I’m Stacey Simms and these are the top diabetes stories and headlines of the past seven days.
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In the news is brought to you by T1D Exchange! T1D Exchange is a nonprofit organization dedicated to improving outcomes for the entire T1D population.
https://t1dexchange.org/stacey/
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New effort to avoid the very common misdiagnosis of type 2 when it’s actually type 1. JDRF and a a company called IQVIA are seeing if artificial intelligence can be used here. IQVIA used machine learning to look at data from individuals diagnosed with T2D and then, later, diagnosed with T1D within a specific time frame. The big problem, the company says, is that medical records are often incomplete and are compiled using different standards and formats. They call it a good starting point though. Earlier studies have shown that possibly 40-percent of adults with new onset type 1 are first misdiagnosed with type 2.
https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2022/08/11/iqvia-algorithm-for-misdiagnoses/

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New UK study about COVID, diabetes and kids.. shows there was an increase in new cases and in DKA. This was from March 2020 to February of 2021, compared to same time the previous year. This was a large study, looking back at cases across 49 sites.
There was a 17% increase in new-onset diabetes from Year 1 to Year 2, mostly of type 1 diabetes. ED visits for DKA dropped by 31.9% during the pandemic year among patients with existing diabetes. There was a 43% increase in severity of new-onset disease from Year 1 to Year 2, with severe DKA increasing by 79% (P < .001) and intensive care admissions by 89% (P < .05 There were limitations to this study, the biggest is that data was only captured for those who went to the emergency room. The question of whether SARS-CoV-2 can trigger new-onset diabetes remains unanswered.

https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/979381#:~:text=There%20was%20a%2017%25%20increase,by%2079%25%20(P%20%3C%20.
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Omipod 5 is now FDA approved for kids as young as two.
Omnipod 5, the first tubeless automated insulin delivery (AID) system in the U.S., was originally cleared for use in individuals aged six and older in January 2022. That makes Omnipod 5 the only AID approved for the toddler set. Tandem’s Control IQ ia approved down to age 6 and Medtronic 780G down to age 7
https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20220822005158/en/Insulet-Announces-FDA-Clearance-of-Omnipod%C2%AE-5-for-Children-Aged-Two-Years-and-Older-with-Type-1-Diabetes
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Milestone from Tandem they say that in the first month since the new mobile bolus feature was released, users have delivered more than 1 million insulin boluses. The company said in a news release that it is the first-ever FDA-cleared smartphone application capable of initiating insulin delivery on both iOS and Android operating systems. The company added that it is now available on approximately 30 different devices.

https://www.drugdeliverybusiness.com/tandem-diabetes-app-insulin-bolus-million/

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What looks like an editorial in a publication called Stability Health caught my eye. It’s all about the shortage of endocrinologists in the US. Right now there are only 8-thousand in practice across the whole country.
Endocrinologists receive the lowest compensation of all internal medicine (IM) specialties — lower even than practicing general internists — and 76–89% of medical students graduate with astronomical debt.
Additionally, these clinicians often make themselves available outside of their office hours. But since this time may not be billable, it is often not supported in salaried compensation.
Separately (but related), in 2016, 71% of entrants to the field of endocrinology were female. Due to America’s long-standing gender wage gap, this may be a contributing factor in wage stagnation.
Roughly 85% of Americans with diabetes rely on a general practitioner for their care. I’ll link up the column so you can take a look.
https://stabilityhealth.com/endocrinologist-shortage/?fbclid=IwAR0jx-nSiOL2UccmoJ9H74SnC6l3M5CCppecGcQ2t2M_zc7U-ydOj4JxfQ4#:~:text=Today%2C%2034.2%20million%20Americans%20are,currently%20practice%20in%20the%20U.S
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Update on one of the CGM smartwatches we’ve been keeping an eye on.. the K-Watch Glucose CGM watch is being tested by a French Company. They had their first clinical trials last year and got results this summer. the first run had a MARD of 29-percent.. brought down to a much better 16-percent. MARD is of course Mean Absolute Relative Difference to a calibrated meter and the gold standard right now is under 10 with Dexcom and Libre’s next offerings closer to 8.. so a way to go here.
https://www.notebookcheck.net/Painless-K-Watch-Glucose-blood-free-CGM-smartwatch-produces-positive-first-in-human-trial-results-as-PKvitality-targets-2024-for-availability.642380.0.html
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Back to the news in a moment but first..
The T1D Exchange Registry is a research study conducted online over time, designed to foster innovation and improve the lives of people with T1D. The platform is open to both adults and children with T1D living in the U.S. Personal information remains confidential and participation is fully voluntary. Once enrolled, participants will complete annual surveys and have the opportunity to sign up for other studies on specific topics related to T1D. The registry aims to improve knowledge of T1D, accelerate the discovery and development of new treatments and technologies, and generate evidence to support policy or insurance changes that help the T1D community. By sharing opinions, experiences and data, patients can help advance meaningful T1D treatment, care and policy.
The registry is now available on the T1D Exchange website and is simple to navigate, mobile and user-friendly. For more information or to register, go to www.t1dregistry.org/stacey
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Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists gave their lifetime Achievement Award to Dr. Kenneth Moritsugu, former surgeon general of the United States. Many of you may know him as the Chairman of the Board of Children with Diabetes you see him at Friends for Life and other events. He’s been involved with lot of national diabetes groups and effort – he was diagnosed with LADA at age 55. He’s also been a guest of this show.. so congrats Dr. Moritsugu.
https://www.healio.com/news/endocrinology/20220814/a-lifetime-of-service-a-conversation-with-kenneth-moritsugu-md-mph-facpm-faade?fbclid=IwAR2DyFSAyxCqeGMpmGHAi1FG1swihxFAPe-WveCaCP6NJrcUd0rFioBedQU
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Next week we’re talking back to school! The wonderful diabetes educator Anna Sabino from Finding Smiles coaching will join me to talk 504, remote monitoring, supplies and lots more. The long format episode out right now is with Patients For Affordable Drugs about the bill that passed the Senate this week. The insulin copay cap was removed, but what does it really mean for medication prices?
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That’s In the News for this week.. if you like it, please share it! Thanks for joining me! See you back here soon.

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